Languedoc Rousillon PDF

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You must provide copyright attribution in the edit summary accompanying your translation by providing an interlanguage link to the source of your translation. Since 1 January 2016, it is part of the new region Occitanie. In southern France, the word for « yes » was the Occitan language word oc. Languedoc-Roussillon was formerly the province of Gévaudan, now the department of Lozère.

A small part of the former Gévaudan lies inside the current Auvergne region. Gévaudan is often considered to be a sub-province inside the province of Languedoc, in which case Languedoc would account for 86. At the regional elections in March 2004, the socialist mayor of Montpellier Georges Frêche, defeated its center-right president. Since then, Georges Frêche has embarked on a complete overhaul of the region and its institutions. On the other hand, there are some who would like to merge the Languedoc-Roussillon and Midi-Pyrénées regions, thus reunifying the old province of Languedoc, and creating a large region. Prior to the 20th century, Occitan was the language spoken in Languedoc, and Catalan was the language spoken in Roussillon. Both have been under pressure from French.

In recent years there have been attempts at reviving of both languages, including Catalan-medium schooling through the La Bressola schools. Occitan literature — still sometimes called Provençal literature — is a body of texts written in Occitan in what is nowadays the South of France. It originated in the poetry of the eleventh- and twelfth- century troubadours, and inspired the rise of vernacular literature throughout medieval Europe. Aimeric de Peguilhan, Giraut de Bornelh and Bertran de Born were major influences in troubadour composition, in the High Middle Ages. The Romantic music composer Déodat de Séverac was born in the region, and, following his schooling in Paris, returned to the region to compose.