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The Uncertain Promises of Indoor Dining in New York City

The Uncertain Promises of Indoor Dining in New York City

A thousand years ago, on March 11th of this year, I went with a friend to Wu’s Wonton King, a Chinatown gem that since its opening, in 2016, has become famous for, somehow, everything: the glorious array of dim sum, the exquisitely tender barbecued meats, the fishes, eels, and crabs plucked live from tanks in the windows, à la minute. Normally, when I visit Wu’s, it’s with a strategically large group so that we can order all of the above and more, and then bring home whatever our groaning insides can’t fit. On this particular day, I was with just one other person, and we split an uncharacteristically austere order of steamed pork buns and a bowl of noodle soup. We were the only people in the restaurant, which could have been partly attributable to our timing—it was a Wednesday morning, too late to be breakfast but too early to count as an early lunch—but almost certainly also had to do with the encroaching coronavirus pandemic, which was just beginning to make itself known in New York.

By now, it’s hard to recall that brief window of time in New York in early March, between our unfettered pre-pandemic life and the start of public shutdowns and self-quarantining, which we have now been enduring for nearly seven months. Venues in Chinatown had been among the first to experience a decline in business, fuelled by racist fears of the virus, which was first identified in the Chinese city of Wuhan. But by the time Mayor Bill de Blasio announced a mandated closure of all bars and restaurants—which, after Governor Andrew Cuomo accelerated the original timeline, took effect on March 16th—the entire city was already slowing down, an anti-crescendo of public activity. After my meal at Wu’s, I hugged my friend goodbye

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Indoor Valley music venues struggle during pandemic, but event organizers get creative | Coronavirus in Arizona

Indoor Valley music venues struggle during pandemic, but event organizers get creative | Coronavirus in Arizona

PHOENIX, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) — October was supposed to be one of the busiest months for local music venues, but the music has stopped for most venues here in the Valley. Some are struggling to keep their doors open as others are getting creative with bringing concerts to the Phoenix area. 

Like most music venues, The Rebel Lounge is quiet and closed. There’s been no live music since March. “In the light of COVID, I don’t know how to do a concert safely, you know. Until there’s a vaccine, I don’t know how you can do the concert,” said Rebel Lounge owner and vice president of National Independent Venue Association, Stephen Chilton. Chilton said last year, he had 600 concerts. This year, he had only 75. “I don’t think there’s an industry harder hit, we are at zero percent revenue for six months,” said Chilton. 

Meanwhile, some event planners are getting into the music scene. “We are a reaction to COVID,” said Bob Bentley with Thompson Event Center and Digital Drive-In. They turned their drive-in movie lot into a drive-in concert.



Beach Boys among 'car concert' series offered by Arizona State Fair

Think of it as a live concert meets a drive-in movie.

Bentley hopes to do a concert on Halloween after their summertime shows were marred by the heat. “I think for us, we want to stay CDC-compliant. We want everyone to be healthy, so lets social distance, lets bring your cars and lets go old school,” said Bentley. 

Meanwhile, indoor venues like The Rebel Lounge don’t have the capabilities for drive-in concerts. “We produce mass gatherings and that’s the least safe thing right now,” said Chilton. Now, NIVA has a Save Our Stages campaign, urging lawmakers to give financial assistance to venues in the next coronavirus relief package. “There’s no way all of these venues are going

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