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Japan’s Suga to Order New Economic Stimulus as Early as November, Nikkei Says | Investing News

Japan’s Suga to Order New Economic Stimulus as Early as November, Nikkei Says | Investing News

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga will order his government to compile extra economic stimulus measures as early as November, the Nikkei newspaper reported on Tuesday.

The move would signal the government’s readiness to deploy more support to cushion Japan’s economy from the significant disruption to consumers and businesses by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The measures could focus on supporting tourism and the restaurant industry from declining consumption, the Nikkei said.

There was no change to the government’s willingness to roll out economic measures if conditions required it, the top government spokesman said when asked about potential stimulus.

“As for financial matters, there is 7.8 trillion yen in coronavirus reserve funds remaining. We’ll utilise that balance first,” Chief Cabinet Secretary Katsunobu Kato told reporters at a news conference.

The government may also consider extending a “Go To Travel” initiative to subsidise domestic tourism as part of the stimulus, the Nikkei reported, without saying how it got the information.

Japan has already rolled out $2.2 trillion in fiscal stimulus in response to the health crisis, including cash payouts to households and small business loans that were partly funded via two supplementary budgets.

The government could decide in late December on a draft of a third extra budget to fund the expected measures, when it draws up plans for next fiscal year’s budget, the Nikkei said.

The world’s third-largest economy has started to recover from the impact the coronavirus has had on demand at home and abroad, including the hit to global trade that hurt Japan’s exports of cars and other manufactured products.

The government last Wednesday said economic activity likely stopped contracting in August.

(Reporting by Daniel Leussink; Editing by Chang-Ran Kim, Christopher Cushing and Tom Hogue)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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Why the market narrative on a November ‘blue wave’ flipped in just 2 weeks and what it means for stocks, according to UBS

Why the market narrative on a November ‘blue wave’ flipped in just 2 weeks and what it means for stocks, according to UBS



Joe Biden wearing a suit and tie: Joe Biden, the Democratic presidential nominee. Getty


© Getty
Joe Biden, the Democratic presidential nominee. Getty

  • The market narrative on what a “blue wave” in November could mean for stocks has flipped over the past two weeks, UBS said in a note on Monday.
  • The prevailing market narrative over the past few months that election victories for Democrats would hurt stocks because of the potential for higher taxes is now dead, according to UBS.
  • Instead, expect stocks to move higher if there’s a blue wave, and don’t be surprised if investors are disappointed if it doesn’t happen, UBS said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Throughout 2020, the consensus view has been that a Joe Biden victory and a “blue wave” in November would be bad for the stock market because of the potential for higher corporate taxes and more regulation.

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But that market narrative has been flipped on its head in the past two weeks, UBS said in a note on Monday.

Now investors expect that a Biden victory and Democratic sweep in Congress could be a catalyst for a reflation trade, in which cyclical and value stocks trade higher and the US dollar weakens, further helping US stock prices.

The impetus for a change of heart among investors is threefold, according to UBS:

  1. “The inability to pass a major fiscal package prior to the election means that it’s increasingly likely to be the Democrats’ top priority after a Blue Wave outcome.”
  2. Higher taxes will be a 2022 problem for investors, not a 2021 problem.
  3. “Biden’s widening lead in the polls and prediction markets, and along with it the likelihood of a Blue Wave, is reducing election uncertainty,” UBS said, adding that a delayed or contested election would be more unsettling to investors than a Democratic sweep of the White House and Congress.
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Here’s why the market narrative on a November blue wave flipped in just 2 weeks, and what it now means for stocks, according to UBS

Here’s why the market narrative on a November blue wave flipped in just 2 weeks, and what it now means for stocks, according to UBS

joe biden
  • The market narrative on what a potential November blue wave could mean for stocks has flipped over the past two weeks, UBS said in a note on Monday.
  • The prevailing market narrative over the past few months that a blue wave election outcome would hurt stocks due to higher taxes is now dead, according to UBS.
  • Instead, expect stocks to move higher if there is a blue wave this November, and don’t be surprised for the potential of investors being disappointed if a blue wave doesn’t happen, UBS said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Throughout 2020, the consensus view has been that a Joe Biden victory, and a potential “blue wave” in November, would be bad for the stock market because of the potential for higher corporate taxes and more regulation.

But that market narrative has been flipped on its head in the past two weeks, UBS said in a note on Monday.

Now, investors expect a Biden victory and Democratic sweep of Congress this November to serve as a the catalyst for a reflation trade, in which cyclical and value stocks trade higher, and the US dollar weakens, further helping US stock prices.

The impetus for a change of heart among investors regarding a blue wave and its impact on stocks is three-fold, according to UBS:

1. “The inability to pass a major fiscal package prior to the election means that it’s increasingly likely to be the Democrats’ top priority after a Blue Wave outcome,” UBS said.

2. Higher taxes will be a 2022 problem for investors, not a 2021 problem, according to UBS.

3. “Biden’s widening lead in the polls and prediction markets, and along with it the likelihood of a Blue Wave, is reducing election uncertainty,” UBS said, adding that a delayed or

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The Senate seats most likely to flip parties in November

The Senate seats most likely to flip parties in November

With less than a month until Election Day, Democrats are picking up momentum toward winning the Senate majority: Challengers are outraising Republican incumbents, and they are leading in polls. They’ve been helped along by Democrat Joe Biden’s widening lead over President Donald Trump, and some Senate Republicans seeking to distance themselves at the last minute from Trump, after spending years backing him.

But anything could happen. Like this: the revelation of an affair involving the Democratic nominee in one of the most pivotal states, North Carolina, as many voters there are casting ballots. And an increase in mail voting carries with it the risk that voters who don’t fill out their ballots correctly won’t be able to vote at all.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

Democrats need a net gain of at least four Senate seats to win the majority, or a Biden presidency and three net wins, which would give the vice president the deciding vote in any ties.

Democrats have a chance in a dozen of the 14 races on this list, but some are in solid Republican territory. We removed the reelection campaign of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., from our rankings – he’s ahead of Democratic challenger Amy McGrath despite the tens of millions of dollars she’s raised to make it competitive.

Here are the top races most likely to flip parties, categorized and ranked from most to least likely.

– More likely to flip than not: Alabama, Colorado and Arizona.

1. Alabama (Democratic-held): There are no changes to the top of our list. Sen. Doug Jones, D-Ala., remains the most vulnerable senator of 2020. He’s running for reelection in one of the most pro-Trump states in the nation. And unlike in 2017, he’s not going up against a seriously flawed Republican opponent. Former Auburn University football coach Tommy Tuberville

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