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4 Expert Tips to Create the Perfect Investor Pitch for Your New Business

4 Expert Tips to Create the Perfect Investor Pitch for Your New Business

When it comes to pitching, the odds often seem stacked against startups. Investors reportedly look at pitch decks for only 3 minutes and 44 seconds, and for every 1,000 pitches an investor hears, they only fund 100 companies. But investors aren’t in short supply, so there has to be another reason why the window of opportunity is so slim. What if the problem is how founders are telling their startup story?



a man and a woman sitting at a table


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Think back to when you were a kid. What were the stories that engaged you most? Had you sat upright on your bed, wide eyed, and pleading for your parents to keep reading? Probably the ones that had a strong main character, a detailed background, and were just short enough to get your full attention. In many ways, the best investor pitches have the same traits. 

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Here’s how to create the perfect investor pitch, with tips from the experts:

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Know your value, market, and investors.

Before you find yourself in a room full of investors, there are three core areas you need to dive into. First off, define exactly what your value is—that means, what customer pain point you’re addressing, how you’re solving it in a new or better way, and why people will be willing to pay for your solution. Start by conducting a number of user interviews to get qualitative data and direct quotes from your targeted audience. Then collect any early traction like sign-ups to free trials, social media engagement, and letters of intent to include in your presentation. 

Next, look at your market size. This is arguably the most important element of your pitch, because if you can’t demonstrate that there is a

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Canada’s struggling hospitality businesses face ‘perfect storm’ as insurers flee

Canada’s struggling hospitality businesses face ‘perfect storm’ as insurers flee

TORONTO (Reuters) – Canadian hospitality businesses, already reeling from the downturn sparked by the coronavirus pandemic, are facing yet another existential threat as insurance companies spike premiums or exit the space, citing losses and the sector’s risks.

FILE PHOTO: Patrons eat in a restaurant as the Quebec government has ordered all restaurants, bars and casinos to close for 28 days effective midnight September 30 as coronavirus disease (COVID-19) numbers continue to rise in Montreal, Quebec, Canada September 30, 2020. REUTERS/Christinne Muschi/File Photo

Even before COVID-19, insurers globally were scaling back from riskier businesses to improve performance. The pandemic’s profit hits have accelerated the trend and led underwriters to exit from, or raise premiums in, select categories.

Hospitality businesses, particularly those needing coverage for accidents caused by alcohol-impaired clients, were already seen as higher risk, said Karen Ritchie, vice president at Baird MacGregor Insurance Brokers and president of the Toronto Insurance Council. The coronavirus exacerbated that.

“It’s a perfect storm,” she said.

Many hospitality companies were already operating on razor-thin margins before pandemic-driven lockdowns. An inability to access affordable insurance could spell the end for them, given they are barely managing to hang on amid distancing restrictions.

While these businesses carry the same risks as elsewhere, the Canadian hospitality industry has faced a bigger hit due to a much smaller insurance market dominated by Lloyd’s syndicates, Ritchie said. Far more domestic insurers cover the space in countries like the United States, spreading out risk, she said.

Lloyd’s is a marketplace that comprises various specialist insurers, or syndicates, who write policies.

Lloyd’s business volumes fell 8.6% in the first half of 2020, reflecting an intentional reduction by several syndicates exposed to poorly performing business segments, the group said in a statement here.

The Lloyd’s market lost 438 million pounds ($569 million), versus

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