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Fuss-free Home Protection Plan With Extras

Fuss-free Home Protection Plan With Extras

Simple and elegant plan that’s likely to appeal to first-time homeowners or renters. 

Home protection insurance can be complicated, what with different claims limits and categories of claims. 

It can be easy to sign up for a plan with a face cover value in the millions, yet have insufficient cover for professional fees – for instance, by surveyors or architects hired to reinstate your building.

Etiqa Tiq Home Insurance offers a simple way to ensure sufficient cover for your valuables, debris disposal and professional fees, by setting them at a percentage of your sums insured. 

This results in a fuss-free policy that only requires you to choose your sums insured for contents and renovation. 

Let’s have a closer look at Etiqa Tiq Home Insurance. 

Pros and cons of Etiqa Tiq Home Insurance

Pros Cons
Easy-to-navigate plan with comprehensive cover Emergency cash allowance may be reduced according to the state of your premises
Sums insured tailored to typical needs, useful guide for new homeowners Emergency home assistance only included for plans 3 years or more
Base plan includes useful cover like emergency cash, ATM fraud, conservancy charges and more Maximum claim of $200 per piece for works of art, paintings, fine glassware and crystal, tapestries, antiques and other collectibles
Competitively priced and affordable

Key features of Etiqa Tiq Home Insurance

#1: Easy to navigate and understand

Etiqa Tiq Home Insurance is designed to help homeowners and tenants get adequate home insurance cover without tripping over the details. For example, cover for debris disposal and professional fees are tagged at 10% of sum insured for renovation and/or building, instead of a fixed amount which may prove to be insufficient. 

Similarly, cover for personal valuables is tagged at 30% of the sum insured for contents insurance. However, there’s a deductible of the first

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A Significant Majority Of Democrats And Republicans Support Strong Consumer Protection Regulations And Tougher Rules For Wall Street

A Significant Majority Of Democrats And Republicans Support Strong Consumer Protection Regulations And Tougher Rules For Wall Street

It has been ten years since the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank) was signed. Given the complex nature of rule writing and the fact that fifteen regulators were involved, not all rules were finalized or implemented. Since Trump came into power, many of the rules that were finalized have been tailored and watered down. Yet, in the vast majority of both Democratic and Republican voters want strong consumer financial protections and tough regulation of the financial services industry.

Yesterday, in an Americans for Financial Reform and  Center for Responsible Lending sponsored-event, Lake Research Partners presented polling data, which shows that when in comes to a desire for tougher regulations for Wall Street, the word bipartisanship still exists.

Lake Research Partners’ key findings were:

·      Over nine in ten voters (91%) say it is important to regulate financial services and products to ensure they are fair to consumers, including 68% who say it is very important.

·      Nearly three-quarters of voters (74%) believe that Wall Street financial companies should be held accountable with tougher rules and enforcement, while only one in ten (10%) believe that their practices have changed enough that they don’t need further regulation.

·      More than half of voters feel that Wall Street and big corporations have gotten too much help from the government in response to the COVID-19 crisis (56%), while less than one in ten (8%) believe that they did not get enough help. Less than a quarter (23%) of voters feel that Wall Street received about the right about of aid.

·      Three-quarters (75%) of voters also believe there should be more government regulation of financial companies, such as Wall Street banks, mortgage lenders, payday lenders, debt collectors,

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California to create its own consumer financial protection agency

California to create its own consumer financial protection agency

SACRAMENTO — California will create a state consumer financial protection agency to fill a void left by federal regulators, who have pulled back on oversight during the Trump administration.



Gavin Newsom wearing a suit and tie: Gov. Gavin Newsom in a Sept. 18, 2019, file photo. On Friday, Newsom signed legislation establishing the state Department of Financial Protection and Innovation to regular credit reporting agencies and debt collectors.


© Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press

Gov. Gavin Newsom in a Sept. 18, 2019, file photo. On Friday, Newsom signed legislation establishing the state Department of Financial Protection and Innovation to regular credit reporting agencies and debt collectors.


Gov. Gavin Newsom signed legislation Friday establishing the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation, a restructured Department of Business Oversight that will expand its focus to credit reporting agencies, debt collectors and financial technology companies that have not previously been subject to state regulation.

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The new state department, Newsom said at an online signing ceremony, will “create conditions for innovation to flourish in a way where we can steward that and we can just work against its excesses. So we support risk-taking, not recklessness.”

AB1864 by Assemblywoman Monique Limón, D-Santa Barbara, gives the state department authority to enforce the Consumer Financial Protection Act of 2010 and regulations issued by the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the agency created by that law.

The department will also be able to develop its own rules to prevent “unlawful, unfair, deceptive or abusive practices,” and seek financial penalties against service providers that engage in them.

In addition to the banks and credit unions that California already regulates, the state will now oversee services such as debt settlement, credit repair, check cashing, rent-to-own contracts and financing for retail sales. Out-of-state banks and some services, including mortgage lenders, escrow agents and investment advisers, are exempt from the law.

“For decades California has attempted to do more for consumers, and truthfully, we’ve fallen short,” Limón said. “Helping consumers ensure that they have an agency that looks out for

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