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5 Best Stories on Real Money: Beating Covid, Market Bubble

5 Best Stories on Real Money: Beating Covid, Market Bubble

Quiz: What’s one advantage the president has that the market does not?

Answer: He can get a doctor’s note telling you everything is wonderful. 

But investors? They’re left on their own, left trying to forecast when a stimulus bill will land, left watching every vaccine trial to spot a winner, left waiting up at night for earnings reports, and left tracking technical indicators for clues about what’s churning underneath the surface. 

Fortunately, investors do, however, have experts who can guide them. Helping us get through this messy, mucky October are Real Money and Real Money Pro writers Jim Cramer, Paul Price, Maleeha Bengali, Alex Frew McMillan, and Jim Collins.

Jim Cramer: Let’s Beat Covid-19

Cramer lays out what is happening right now to get the pandemic under control and what it will look like not that long from now — even before a vaccine is available.

Here’s the tests and therapies that Cramer contends will change the channel on the Covid outlook.

Price: Give Stocks a Second Chance 

Few stocks go up in straight-line moves. Instead, writes Price, most tend to spurt higher, tail off, then rise again. While the interim selloffs often shake out traders who mainly trade on momentum, plus those who fail to understand the companies’ true worth, there’s still opportunity awaiting for those willing to give second chances.

See how Price would play a select group of stocks — even following their earlier rebounds from March’s lows.

Jim Collins: There’s Trouble in Bubbleland 

We are in the midst of a unprecedented financial bubble, writes Collins. Will a recovery from the Covid-19 lockdowns ease the bubble before it bursts in our faces?

Read why Collins isn’t holding his breath, and how the situation could play out for insurers and others. 

Bengali: It’s Value Vs. Growth. Pick One.

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Global Real Estate Leasing Market Procurement Intelligence Report with COVID-19 Impact Analysis

Global Real Estate Leasing Market Procurement Intelligence Report with COVID-19 Impact Analysis

The Global Real Estate Leasing market will register an incremental spend of about $21 billion, growing at a CAGR of 5.25% during the five-year forecast period. A targeted strategic approach to Global Real Estate Leasing sourcing can unlock several opportunities for buyers. This report also offers market impact and new opportunities created due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Request free sample pages

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201012005371/en/

SpendEdge has announced the release of its Global Real Estate Leasing Market Procurement Intelligence Report (Graphic: Business Wire)

Key benefits to buy this report:

  • What are the market dynamics?

  • What are the key market trends?

  • What are the category growth drivers?

  • What are the constraints on category growth?

  • Who are the suppliers in this market?

  • What are the demand-supply shifts?

  • What are the major category requirements?

  • What are the procurement best practices in this market?

Information on Latest Trends and Supply Chain Market Information Knowledge centre on COVID-19 impact assessment

SpendEdge’s reports now include an in-depth complimentary analysis of the COVID-19 impact on procurement and the latest market data to help your company overcome sourcing challenges. Our Global Real Estate Leasing market procurement intelligence report offers actionable procurement intelligence insights, sourcing strategies, and action plans to mitigate risks arising out of the current pandemic situation. The insights offered by our reports will help procurement professionals streamline supply chain operations and gain insights into the best procurement practices to mitigate losses.

Insights into buyer strategies and tactical negotiation levers:

Several strategic and tactical negotiation levers are explained in the report to help buyers achieve the best prices for Global Real Estate Leasing market. The report also aids buyers with relevant Global Real Estate Leasing pricing levels, pros and cons of prevalent pricing models such as volume-based pricing, spot

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Hidden Home Risks That Send Insurance Through the Roof | Real Estate

Hidden Home Risks That Send Insurance Through the Roof | Real Estate

Homebuyers may be able to lower their insurance costs by updating those systems and by installing water sensors or a whole-house monitoring system, which shuts off the water supply if a leak is detected, Naughton says. Those systems can range from $600 to several thousand dollars, she says.

Flood risk is also a concern, Naughton says. Flooding isn’t covered by regular homeowners insurance policies, and typically only homes in the highest-risk zones are required by mortgage lenders to buy special flood policies. But the federal government’s flood maps may understate the risk to many properties, especially as hurricanes get stronger and bring intense rainfall along with larger storm surges.

“We’re seeing coastal flooding that’s going in quite a bit,” Naughton says. “People who previously didn’t consider flood insurance should because of the rain aspect as well as the surges.”

Again, talking to the neighbors and a local insurance agent can help you assess the potential costs. You can get quotes for flood insurance from the National Flood Insurance Program as well as a few private insurers.

Earth-shaking risks

The U.S. Geological Survey says 16 states are at high risk for a damaging earthquake in the next half-century: Alaska, Arkansas, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

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‘For me, a revolution is less romantic now. The consequences are more real’

‘For me, a revolution is less romantic now. The consequences are more real’

A student. A food seller. A creative producer. A scientist. All they have in common is that they took part in the Citizenship Act protests last winter. Months later, the Delhi Police called them in for questioning in its controversial riots case, which blames the communal violence that took place in India’s capital in February on a conspiracy by Citizenship Act protestors to overthrow the Narendra Modi government. Over 70 protestors have been interrogated in the case. Below is an account by one of them.

Read more about the case which has been described as a witchhunt against protestors here. Read more accounts of those who have been questioned in the case here.


December 2019 was a difficult month, the young creative entrepreneur recalled. The city he had grown up in was beset by protests. He wanted to go attend them. Not that he had a history of formal activism – “only active and vocal as an individual” – but he was just aghast at this new law that “clearly differentiated on the basis of religion”.

But he was stuck at a place far away from Delhi. What could he really do? Use the internet, of course. He started collecting “pictures of protests and police brutality from all over the country” and started sharing them on his Instagram.

“Whatever little you can do or say as an individual” to oppose injustice, he explained.

Then as the protests spread out to other parts of the country – except the North East where they had begun much before Delhi – he also started putting out protest calendars. “From the middle of December to end of January, I used to post a protest schedule everyday…of where the protests were nationwide,” he recalled.

It was largely crowdsourced information. “I would scan online, look for

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Analysis: The bubble is the real MVP of this NBA season

Analysis: The bubble is the real MVP of this NBA season

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver waves to Los Angeles Lakers owner Jeanie Buss sitting nearby as he attends Game 2 of basketball's NBA Finals between the Lakers and the Miami Heat on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla.

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver waves to Los Angeles Lakers owner Jeanie Buss sitting nearby as he attends Game 2 of basketball’s NBA Finals between the Lakers and the Miami Heat on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla.

AP

The bubble hasn’t burst.

And the finish line is in sight.

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver acknowledges that he had doubts if this was even possible. So did many players. Racial injustice protests were happening around the country and coronavirus positivity rates were skyrocketing in Florida when the NBA moved into Walt Disney World — the league calls it a campus, everyone else calls it a bubble — three months ago. It wasn’t a stretch to think it was only a matter of time before trouble started.

Never happened. The NBA got the games in and kept the virus out. Players managed to find a balance between what they felt were their basketball obligations and social responsibilities.

This season, a year that was longer than a year and difficult in almost every imaginable way, is nearing an end; the Los Angeles Lakers have a 3-1 lead in the NBA Finals over the Miami Heat, with a potential title-clincher in Game 5 coming Friday night.

“The job’s not done,” Lakers forward LeBron James said.

He’s right, on many levels. The NBA came here to crown a champion; that hasn’t happened yet. Players came here to use their platform to fight against racial inequality and voter suppression; those efforts continue. And the coronavirus pandemic rages on; no end in sight there, either.

Outside the bubble, problems reign.

Inside the bubble, things are not perfect. It has not been easy. Often, it was not fun.

But it worked.

“I wanted everybody to have perspective on how

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