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South Carolina announces new relief for nonprofits, small businesses

South Carolina announces new relief for nonprofits, small businesses

Small and minority-owned businesses and nonprofits in South Carolina may apply for grant awards to be reimbursed for qualifying expenditures for providing services or revenue loss because of the response to COVID-19.



a group of people walking on a sidewalk


© Provided by Washington Examiner


Announced by the Department of Administration on Monday, grants in the amount of $2,500 up to $50,000 will be funded with federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act money.

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Businesses and nonprofits can apply for relief grants beginning Oct. 19, and applications must be received no later than Nov. 1.

To qualify for a grant, small and minority-owned businesses must employ 25 or fewer employees, be located in South Carolina, have been operational from Oct. 13, 2019, to present and must have experienced economic effects because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Nonprofits must be a registered 501(c)(3) organization, registered as a public charity in South Carolina, physically located within the state and have been operational from Oct. 13, 2019, to present.

Grants will be administered by the Department of Administration in cooperation with Guidehouse Inc., a professional grant management services provider.

Tags: States, News, Coronavirus, Business, South Carolina

Original Author: Vivian Jones, The Center Square

Original Location: South Carolina announces new relief for nonprofits, small businesses

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Will individuals see the savings from insurance pandemic relief? Not quite

Will individuals see the savings from insurance pandemic relief? Not quite

Health insurance companies are offering their corporate customers rebates to offset premium costs and reflect lower medical spending as patients avoid doctors’ offices, routine procedures and elective surgeries during the coronavirus pandemic.



a person sitting at a desk: ACA Health Experts call center expert, Cynthia Hernandez helps Tiffany Wright get health insurance at the Ahmed and Roshan Virani Children's Clinic, Monday,Nov. 14, 2016 in Houston. It’s likely that 2021 health insurance premiums will remain around the same prices as 2020, experts said.


© Karen Warren, Staff Photographer / Houston Chronicle

ACA Health Experts call center expert, Cynthia Hernandez helps Tiffany Wright get health insurance at the Ahmed and Roshan Virani Children’s Clinic, Monday,Nov. 14, 2016 in Houston. It’s likely that 2021 health insurance premiums will remain around the same prices as 2020, experts said.


It’s unclear how big an impact the rebates, in the form of credits, might have on the premiums companies pay and contributions their employees make. Premiums vary from company to company and, depending on the circumstances, the rebates could lower premiums, keep them from rising or at least limit increases.

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Companies, meanwhile, will decide whether to adjust employee contributions to health insurance premiums based on the rebates they might receive.

Fewer claims were filed during the pandemic, meaning insurance companies paid out less, kept more of the premiums they collect and earned higher profits. As a result, insurers are coming under pressure to return some of the windfall to customers, particularly since the Affordable Care Act prohibits insurers from keeping more that more than 20 percent of premiums for administrative costs and profits.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services issued guidance in August that allows insurers to refund the excess profits this or next year as premium credits, which are discounts that reduce the amount paid monthly.

On Tuesday, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas said it would help customers during the pandemic by issuing $104 million in premium credits to employers that it insures. It also said it would adjust the price of 2021 premiums for individual and group plans, saving buyers

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Desperate Americans hit by pandemic beg Congress, Trump to pass economic relief bill

Desperate Americans hit by pandemic beg Congress, Trump to pass economic relief bill

(Reuters) – Sylvia Padilla spent last Thursday checking food pantries in Lubbock, Texas for groceries to feed herself, her daughter and three-year-old grandson.

Sylvia Padilla poses for a photo outside St. John’s United Methodist Church in Lubbock, Texas, U.S. on October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Brad Brooks

Some places were closed, others had nothing available. Outside the shuttered St. John’s United Methodist Church, Padilla, 50, recounted her struggle to survive during the economic disaster that the novel coronavirus pandemic had dumped upon her, choking words out through tears of fear and frustration.

“This is like a nightmare I can’t wake up from,” Padilla said, resting her face in her hands. “It really feels like a nightmare, but it’s our reality.”

Like many Americans, Padilla is barely getting by and says she desperately needs government help. She received a $1,200 check in April from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act passed by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Donald Trump on March 27.

The check helped her pay back rent she owed and she and others are hoping that lawmakers and the Trump administration can reach accord soon on another relief package after months of disagreements.

“We’ve got some potatoes and beans at home. A bit of flour for tortillas. We’re just trying to make that stretch,” said Padilla, whose business selling food to construction workers ended with the pandemic and her daughter last month lost her job in retail sales.

“A new stimulus check would really mean the world to me right now.”

After March’s shutdowns to curb the spread of the virus, unemployment in the United States shot to levels here not seen since the Great Depression. Many jobs returned as parts of the economy reopened, and consumer spending rebounded, thanks in part to the $2.2 trillion stimulus

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Desperate Americans Hit by Pandemic Beg Congress, Trump to Pass Economic Relief Bill | Investing News

Desperate Americans Hit by Pandemic Beg Congress, Trump to Pass Economic Relief Bill | Investing News

By Brad Brooks, Mimi Dwyer and Rich McKay

(Reuters) – Sylvia Padilla spent last Thursday checking food pantries in Lubbock, Texas for groceries to feed herself, her daughter and three-year-old grandson.

Some places were closed, others had nothing available. Outside the shuttered St. John’s United Methodist Church, Padilla, 50, recounted her struggle to survive during the economic disaster that the novel coronavirus pandemic had dumped upon her, choking words out through tears of fear and frustration.

“This is like a nightmare I can’t wake up from,” Padilla said, resting her face in her hands. “It really feels like a nightmare, but it’s our reality.”

Like many Americans, Padilla is barely getting by and says she desperately needs government help. She received a $1,200 check in April from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act passed by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Donald Trump on March 27.

The check helped her pay back rent she owed and she and others are hoping that lawmakers and the Trump administration can reach accord soon on another relief package after months of disagreements.

“We’ve got some potatoes and beans at home. A bit of flour for tortillas. We’re just trying to make that stretch,” said Padilla, whose business selling food to construction workers ended with the pandemic and her daughter last month lost her job in retail sales.

“A new stimulus check would really mean the world to me right now.”

After March’s shutdowns to curb the spread of the virus, unemployment in the United States shot to levels https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-economy/coronavirus-deals-u-s-economy-great-depression-like-job-losses-high-unemployment-idUSKBN22K1NS not seen since the Great Depression. Many jobs returned as parts of the economy reopened, and consumer spending rebounded, thanks in part to the $2.2 trillion stimulus bill.

Now that cash, paid directly to individual Americans and small businesses to pay

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Stocks Rise on Hopes of a U.S. Economic Relief Deal: Live Updates

Stocks Rise on Hopes of a U.S. Economic Relief Deal: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:

  • European stocks rose on Monday and Wall Street futures pointed to a rise in the S&P 500 when trading starts later in the day, following Asian stocks higher.

  • The Stoxx Europe 600 rose 0.5 percent, and the benchmark stock indexes in France and Germany each climbed less than half a percent. Shares in China and Hong Kong rose following the holiday week in China and expectations that President Xi Jinping would announce later this week more investment for technology in Shenzhen and increase the city’s links to Hong Kong.

  • U.S. stocks gained last week on hopes that Congress and the Treasury Department would agree to a broad economic relief package. But on Saturday, Senate Republicans balked at the cost of another deal, while Democrats, led by Speaker Nancy Pelosi, said the package did not go far enough. On Sunday, the White House suggested an agreement could still be reached before the election. In the meantime, traders will also get more updates on how individual companies are weathering the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic as third-quarter earnings seasons begins.

  • After a rally last week, oil prices declined on Monday as stalled production restarted in Norway and Libya. U.S. bond markets are closed for Columbus Day, a federal holiday that is recognized in some parts of the country as Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

  • Shares in the airline group IAG fell 1.6 percent after a sudden management shake up, in which the chief executive of British Airways will be replaced by the head of Aer Lingus.

Credit…Jeremy M. Lange for The New York Times

Millions

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