Browsed by
Tag: rules

These are the new rules for the future of the planet

These are the new rules for the future of the planet

This article is part of the New New Rules of Business.

Loading...

Load Error

When COVID-19 lockdowns forced the public and businesses to a standstill, the world saw a temporary respite from pollution, a brief drop in global emissions, and a glimpse at the future we could have if we changed the way we impact our environment. How can we make that future a reality? On June 30, a subset of the Fast Company Impact Council, an invitation-only group of entrepreneurs, business leaders, and innovators across industries, considered that question.

In a roundtable discussion led by Fast Company senior editor Morgan Clendaniel, business leaders discussed the Future of the Planet—and what businesses can do to create better sustainability policies. The session participants were, in alphabetical order: Caroline Brown, managing director at Closed Loop Partners; Audrey Choi, chief marketing officer and chief sustainability officer at Morgan Stanley; Jonathan Neman, CEO and founder of Sweetgreen; Gayle Schueller, VP and chief sustainability officer at 3M; Troy Swope, CEO of Footprint LLC; and Julie Wainwright, founder and CEO of The RealReal. Excerpts of the roundtable have been edited for length and clarity.

Caroline Brown: The trends that we saw going into the pandemic, which were based on express consumer value sets—for more sustainability, for more transparency, for circularity—we’ve actually seen an uptick and acceleration in an interest for companies to acquire and scale these solutions. What we see in certain industries is that the solutions to solve these problems, they’re pretty early stage. They may be living at the pilot level, they may be living in early-stage commercialization, but married to this problem of accountability is also, are there tools out there that can be scaled, so that big companies can take action? I think as we’re seeing people coming out of the pandemic, more

Read the rest
Northern England mayors call for bigger financial support ahead of new COVID-19 rules

Northern England mayors call for bigger financial support ahead of new COVID-19 rules

LONDON (Reuters) – Leaders of major cities in northern England on Saturday asked for more generous economic support for workers and businesses facing local lockdown, saying the government’s current proposals would wreak economic hardship on their citizens.



a group of people walking on a sidewalk: FILE PHOTO: Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Manchester


© Reuters/MOLLY DARLINGTON
FILE PHOTO: Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Manchester

British finance minister Rishi Sunak on Friday offered extra help for businesses and people who are forced to stop work during local coronavirus lockdowns.

But Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester, said that the support package was unacceptable ahead of the expected introduction of new restrictions in large parts of northern England.

He called for an increase to the proposed two-thirds of wages for furloughed workers, while government needed to recognise a broader array of businesses that would be impacted.

To accept the package would be “to surrender our residents to hardship in the run up to Christmas, and our businesses to potential failure or collapse,” Burnham told reporters.

Video: Stronger link to rule of law is key to passing EU budget: European parliamentarian (CNBC)

Stronger link to rule of law is key to passing EU budget: European parliamentarian

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Burnham said that he and other mayors were writing to lawmakers to call for a vote on the package, with a view to getting it rejected and replacing it with new support measures.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson will make a statement to parliament on Monday about potential new lockdown restrictions, after lawmakers have been handed more say over COVID-19 rules.

“The rising incidence in parts of the country mean that it is very likely that certain local areas will face further restrictions,” Edward Lister, a senior aide to the prime minister, said in a letter to lawmakers on Friday.

An Office for National Statistics survey

Read the rest
Northern England Mayors Call for Bigger Financial Support Ahead of New COVID-19 Rules | World News

Northern England Mayors Call for Bigger Financial Support Ahead of New COVID-19 Rules | World News

LONDON (Reuters) – Leaders of major cities in northern England on Saturday asked for more generous economic support for workers and businesses facing local lockdown, saying the government’s current proposals would wreak economic hardship on their citizens.

British finance minister Rishi Sunak on Friday offered extra help for businesses and people who are forced to stop work during local coronavirus lockdowns.

But Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester, said that the support package was unacceptable ahead of the expected introduction of new restrictions in large parts of northern England.

He called for an increase to the proposed two-thirds of wages for furloughed workers, while government needed to recognise a broader array of businesses that would be impacted.

To accept the package would be “to surrender our residents to hardship in the run up to Christmas, and our businesses to potential failure or collapse,” Burnham told reporters.

Burnham said that he and other mayors were writing to lawmakers to call for a vote on the package, with a view to getting it rejected and replacing it with new support measures.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson will make a statement to parliament on Monday about potential new lockdown restrictions, after lawmakers have been handed more say over COVID-19 rules.

“The rising incidence in parts of the country mean that it is very likely that certain local areas will face further restrictions,” Edward Lister, a senior aide to the prime minister, said in a letter to lawmakers on Friday.

An Office for National Statistics survey on Friday showed that 1% and 0.9% of people in the North East and North West respectively are estimated to have had COVID-19 in the week to Sept 28, compared to an average of 0.4% for England.

Parts of northern England have already been under extra restrictions since last

Read the rest
Strict rules keep business out of New Mexico loan program

Strict rules keep business out of New Mexico loan program

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Only about $20 million of a $400 million loan program for New Mexico small businesses hit by the pandemic has been approved to send out since the program began in August, according to the state agency running the program.

“We created the program, believing that about 5,000 applications would be processed. And it’s a much smaller volume than that,” said New Mexico Finance Authority CEO Marquita Russel at a presentation to state legislators Tuesday.

Low participation has saved the agency money on contractors, Russel said.

But it’s also a sign that the legislation isn’t reaching many small businesses. Fewer than 900 businesses have applied for loans under the program, which range from $500 to $75,000.


That’s despite ongoing pain in the New Mexico economy where the 11.3% August unemployment rate was far higher than the national average of 8.4%, and businesses face occupancy limits ranging from 75% for hotels to 25% for restaurants.

Hundreds of applications have been rejected.

Around 85% of those businesses that didn’t qualify for the Small Business Recovery Loan Fund failed to meet the requirement of showing a loss of at least 30% of revenue in April and May compared with the same period in 2019.

That included for-profit companies that already had “business in the hopper,” Russel said, even if they’re going broke now.

It also includes nonprofits that raise the bulk of their money during other times of the year, and there’s no flexibility in the program for businesses that are less than a year old and therefore can’t compare revenues.

The fund gives two months’ worth of operating expenses to eligible entities owned by residents at an interest rate of around 2%, with no payments required in the first year.

Investment and Pension Oversight Committee Chairman Sen. George

Read the rest
A Significant Majority Of Democrats And Republicans Support Strong Consumer Protection Regulations And Tougher Rules For Wall Street

A Significant Majority Of Democrats And Republicans Support Strong Consumer Protection Regulations And Tougher Rules For Wall Street

It has been ten years since the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank) was signed. Given the complex nature of rule writing and the fact that fifteen regulators were involved, not all rules were finalized or implemented. Since Trump came into power, many of the rules that were finalized have been tailored and watered down. Yet, in the vast majority of both Democratic and Republican voters want strong consumer financial protections and tough regulation of the financial services industry.

Yesterday, in an Americans for Financial Reform and  Center for Responsible Lending sponsored-event, Lake Research Partners presented polling data, which shows that when in comes to a desire for tougher regulations for Wall Street, the word bipartisanship still exists.

Lake Research Partners’ key findings were:

·      Over nine in ten voters (91%) say it is important to regulate financial services and products to ensure they are fair to consumers, including 68% who say it is very important.

·      Nearly three-quarters of voters (74%) believe that Wall Street financial companies should be held accountable with tougher rules and enforcement, while only one in ten (10%) believe that their practices have changed enough that they don’t need further regulation.

·      More than half of voters feel that Wall Street and big corporations have gotten too much help from the government in response to the COVID-19 crisis (56%), while less than one in ten (8%) believe that they did not get enough help. Less than a quarter (23%) of voters feel that Wall Street received about the right about of aid.

·      Three-quarters (75%) of voters also believe there should be more government regulation of financial companies, such as Wall Street banks, mortgage lenders, payday lenders, debt collectors,

Read the rest