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Which is more creative, the arts or the sciences?

Which is more creative, the arts or the sciences?

Which is more creative, the arts or the sciences?
Creativity in STEM is very similar to creativity in the arts, indicating that a holistic approach to teaching creativity in schools and universities, would benefit all. Credit: Pixabay

International expert in creativity and innovation, UniSA’s Professor David Cropley, is calling for Australian schools and universities to increase their emphasis on teaching creativity, as new research shows it is a core competency across all disciplines and critical for ensuring future job success.


Conducted in partnership with visiting Ph.D. researcher Kim van Broekhoven from Maastricht University in the Netherlands, the research explores the nature of creativity in determining if specific differences exist between creativity in the sciences and creativity in the arts.

The researchers found that creativity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) is very similar to creativity in the arts, indicating that a holistic approach to teaching creativity in schools and universities, would benefit all.

UniSA’s Professor David Cropley says the study provides a valuable insight into how education systems might assess and foster students’ creative capabilities.

“The big change for education systems would be moving away from a rather fragmented and haphazard approach to teaching creativity, to a much more holistic and integrated approach,” Prof Cropley says.

“To prepare the next generation for the future, we need to understand the gaps in the market—the human skills that computers, artificial intelligence and automation cannot achieve—and this is where creativity fits.

“Until this research, we didn’t know whether creativity in STEM was the same as creativity in anything, or if there was something unique about creativity in STEM. If creativity was different in STEM—that is, it involved special attitudes or abilities—then we’d need to teach STEM students differently to develop their creativity.

“As it turns out, creativity is general in nature—it is essentially a multi-faceted competency that involves similar attitudes, disposition,

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Detroit-born economist Paul Milgrom wins Nobel Prize in economic sciences

Detroit-born economist Paul Milgrom wins Nobel Prize in economic sciences

It was in the middle of the night and the Nobel Prize committee couldn’t reach their 2020 economic sciences winner, Detroit-born professor Paul R. Milgrom. 



a screenshot of a computer screen: Winners of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel for 2020 at a press conference in Stockholm, Monday Oct. 12, 2020. Americans Paul R. Milgrom, left, and Robert B. Wilson have won the Nobel Prize in economics for "improvements to auction theory and inventions of new auction formats."


© Anders Wiklund/TT via AP
Winners of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel for 2020 at a press conference in Stockholm, Monday Oct. 12, 2020. Americans Paul R. Milgrom, left, and Robert B. Wilson have won the Nobel Prize in economics for “improvements to auction theory and inventions of new auction formats.”

Luckily, Milgrom’s co-winner is also his neighbor.

According to Stanford University, where the winning duo currently teaches, Robert B. Wilson trekked to Milgrom’s house in the middle of the night, knocking incessantly to tell him the good news. 

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You can watch that moment, and the Michigan-raised winner’s stunned reaction, below.

Milgrom was born in Detroit in 1948. He graduated Oak Park High School and went on to complete his bachelor’s degree in mathematics at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

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He and Wilson won for their improvements to auction theory and inventions of new auction formats. According to the Nobel Prize, “(t)heir discoveries have benefitted sellers, buyers, and taxpayers around the world.”

So…what is auction theory? 

People are usually selling things to the highest bigger and buy from the cheapest offer. But the price of an auctioned object — whether it is an art or an antique — changes wildly from auction to auction, the Nobel Prize release explained. 

Milgrom and Wilson studied how auctions work, which is difficult because there are so much factors to take in, especially the bidder’s behavior. They focused on things that are a little harder to auction, like securities, minerals and energy. 

Wilson’s theory

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2 U.S. Economists Awarded Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences : NPR

2 U.S. Economists Awarded Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences : NPR

The Nobel Prize gold medal during manufacture at the Swedish Mint. Each laureate receives the medal, which has the likeness of Alfred Nobel on its face.

Markus Marcetic/Courtesy of Myntverket (Swedish Mint)


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Markus Marcetic/Courtesy of Myntverket (Swedish Mint)

The 2020 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences was awarded to Paul Milgrom and Robert Wilson, both of Stanford University. The prize citation says Milgrom and Wilson were awarded the prize “for improvements to auction theory and inventions of new auction formats.”

“Auctions are everywhere and affect our everyday lives.” the prize committee said in a statement. Milgrom and Wilson’s work “benefit[s] sellers, buyers and taxpayers around the world.”

The Prize in Economic Sciences was established in 1968 by the Sveriges Riksbank, Sweden’s central bank, to mark its 300th anniversary. It was first awarded in 1969, joining the five original prizes established by Alfred Nobel in his 1895 will.

Like the winners in physics and chemistry, the laureates in economic sciences are selected by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm. The prize brings with it a gold medal and a cash award which this year is 10 million Swedish krona ($1.12 million), which will be shared by Wilson and Milgrom.

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Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences Is Awarded to U.S. Academics for Invention of New Auction Formats

Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences Is Awarded to U.S. Academics for Invention of New Auction Formats

U.S. academics Paul R. Milgrom and Robert B. Wilson shared the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for new insights into how auctions work, and how different auction designs can help buyers and sellers meet their goals.

The announcement Monday gave the U.S. a clean sweep of this year’s Nobel Prizes, with at least one American citizen winning in each of the five categories for which individuals were selected.

“There has been an enormous investment in research in the U.S., and that has paid off,” said Göran K. Hansson, secretary-general of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, which awards the prizes.

Auctions play a big part in setting the price of many of the goods and services people use every day, although their reach isn’t always appreciated, even by those who have spent decades studying them.

In a news conference announcing the prize, Dr. Wilson initially declared that he had never taken part in an auction explicitly, before being reminded that wasn’t the case.

“My wife points out to me that we bought ski-boots on eBay, and I guess that’s an auction,” he told reporters.

The internet has helped make auctions even more pervasive in daily life, but the breakthroughs for which the prize was awarded predate its arrival.

The application of the insights and new designs developed by Drs. Milgrom and Wilson have been particularly significant for allocating public goods, such as radio spectrum, fishing quotas and airport landing slots.

While governments and taxpayers want to maximize their revenues from selling those goods, the danger is that they will be too successful, and force the winner to pay so much that delivery of the associated service—such as mobile phone connections, or flights—is impaired. Understanding how auction formats match complex objectives helps avoid such outcomes.

Their theory has benefited “buyers sellers,

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Singapore University of Social Sciences Chooses Ellucian Banner Cloud

Singapore University of Social Sciences Chooses Ellucian Banner Cloud

Singapore institution’s digitalization transformation drives choice of managed cloud services with Ellucian and Fujitsu Asia

Ellucian, the leading provider of software and services built to power higher education, and Fujitsu Asia, a leading information and communication technology company, today announced that Singapore University of Social Sciences (SUSS), has decided to move to the cloud with Ellucian Banner.

Ellucian Banner Cloud is a powerful Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) solution designed specifically for higher education. The innovative cloud-based offering empowers institutions to efficiently and effectively manage all human resources, finance, and student information processes in a modern digital environment.

“As our university continues to grow in Singapore and regionally, our priority continues to deliver student-centered learning experiences that will empower our graduates to be purposeful global citizens and serve society,” said Gary Teo, Director of Campus IT Services, Singapore University of Social Sciences. “Our digital transformation is a core enabler in our mission to deliver world class student experiences and operational excellence. We look forward to working closely with Ellucian and Fujitsu towards achieving a successful deployment of our new cloud-based platform solution.”

“The cloud can serve as a force multiplier to achieve the goals of today’s educational institutions – improving institutional productivity while mitigating potential data risks from academic processes,” said Fujitsu Asia’s President Uno Motohiko. “Fujitsu is committed to help institutions transform by delivering business value with cutting-edge digital innovation and our experience in managing complex enterprise environment. We are delighted to support SUSS with an array of new possibilities through a seamless and resource-efficient cloud solution. Digital-native learners can enjoy enhanced experiences and mobility while the school gleans better insights, all in a highly-secure and agile environment.”

“Across the board, institutions are simply outgrowing their homegrown solutions,” said Ellucian President and CEO, Laura Ipsen. “Implementing a cloud-based environment is

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