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Senate committee slams blanket ban on TikTok – Newspaper

Senate committee slams blanket ban on TikTok – Newspaper

ISLAMABAD: The Senate Committee on Delegated Legislation on Monday criticised the telecom regulator for banning TikTok and noted that Pakistan has to pace up with global development and take corrective measures instead of adopting isolationist approach.

The Senate committee that met under the chairmanship of Senator Kauda Babar at the Parliament House discussed the ban on the short video-sharing platform by the Pakistan Telecommunication Authority (PTA).

After receiving complaints from different segments of society over immoral and indecent content being shared on the app, the PTA gave several warnings to TikTok before finally slapping a ban on the Chinese app on Oct 10.

However, members of the Senate committee maintained that blocking of social media platforms and restricting IT companies was not the answer to check the spread of questionable material.

Asks govt to take corrective measures instead of adopting ‘isolationist’ approach

Such an approach by the regulator would push Pakistan off the development bandwagon, Senator Babar said. “It was essential to regulate content if that was violating the laws of the country instead of imposing a blanket ban on the whole application or platform,” he remarked.

The committee asked the PTA to provide detail of the rules under which TikTok had been blocked. The relevant officials, however, informed the committee that the ban was not a ‘permanent’ feature as it could be overturned once the app management assured the government that they would abide by the laws of Pakistan.

Earlier, when the Senate committee was informed that TikTok, owned by ByteDance company of China, had recently been in trouble in many countries, the senators maintained that TikTok’s trouble in countries such as the United States and India were mainly due to political reasons and the decisions were not based on any merit.

In Pakistan, TikTok with around 20 million

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The financial record of Tommy Tuberville, the Alabama Republican Senate hopeful, raises questions about his judgment.

The financial record of Tommy Tuberville, the Alabama Republican Senate hopeful, raises questions about his judgment.

Tommy Tuberville, the Republican candidate for Senate in Alabama, is running in large measure on his experience in college football’s Southeastern Conference, known as the S.E.C., where he coached Auburn University.

But he has had experience with another S.E.C., the Securities and Exchange Commission, and other financial regulators.

A review by The New York Times found that Mr. Tuberville, who leads Senator Doug Jones, a Democrat, in the polls, has a history of involvement with at least three people who were later convicted of financial fraud in what were described as Ponzi schemes. Mr. Tuberville was largely seen as a victim and never charged with a crime.

In two episodes, Mr. Tuberville lost millions of dollars. A third was more minor, when Mr. Tuberville and his wife, Suzanne, bought a home through a company created by a lawyer who was later convicted of running a real estate-related Ponzi scheme.

The Times review included a small charitable foundation created by Mr. Tuberville, finding that its tax records indicated that less than a third of its proceeds went to the veterans’ causes it was set up to advance. The foundation also had bookkeeping issues.

The review raised questions about Mr. Tuberville’s judgment and financial acumen. While he has said on the campaign trail that he hoped to serve on the “banking finance” committee — the Senate has separate, and prestigious, banking and finance committees — he has at times undercut his own qualifications. Regarding an ill-fated hedge fund venture, he once told a reporter, “I’m not smart enough to understand all the numbers.”

In a statement, Mr. Tuberville’s campaign largely deflected financial questions. “Doug Jones, Chuck Schumer, and other liberal, Swamp Democrats are spreading lies in an attempt to smear Coach Tuberville’s career, accomplishments, and charitable service,” the statement said, adding, “Coach

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‘Green tsunami’: Inside Senate Republicans’ financial freak-out

‘Green tsunami’: Inside Senate Republicans’ financial freak-out

The online fundraising edge that Democrats have enjoyed for years has mushroomed into an overpowering force, with small-dollar donors smashing “donate” buttons over the last three months to process their disgust for President Donald Trump, fury with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and grief for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Propelled by the wave of money, Democrats have suddenly expanded the Senate battlefield to a dozen competitive races, burying long-contested states like Iowa and Maine in TV ads while also overwhelming Republican opponents in states like Alaska, Kansas and South Carolina that are suddenly tightening.

Where most of the top Democratic Senate candidates two years ago raised $4 million to $7 million in the third quarter of 2018, their contenders this year are multiplying those totals. Colorado’s John Hickenlooper raised $22 million, more than six times what his presidential campaign raised before he dropped out of that race in 2019. Iowa’s Theresa Greenfield and North Carolina’s Cal Cunningham each cleared $28 million.

And on Sunday, South Carolina Democrat Jaime Harrison announced a record $57 million third-quarter haul for his race against GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham, where the most favorable public polling for Graham in the last month has shown him leading by a single point. Altogether, the money has given Democrats a TV spending edge in 12 of the 13 most expensive Senate races.

“The money is indicative [of] how much energy there is on their side, and the lack thereof on our side,” said Mike DuHaime, a Republican consultant. “I think we’re finding that Trump — the energy for Trump — is not always transferable, the same way it wasn’t transferable for Democrats from Obama.”

GOP operative Corry Bliss, who coined the “green wave” warning about House Republicans getting swamped by Democratic cash in 2018, said of 2020:

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Senate Republicans will ‘go along with’ White House stimulus proposal despite their pushback

Senate Republicans will ‘go along with’ White House stimulus proposal despite their pushback

President Trump’s economic adviser, Larry Kudlow, said Sunday that Senate Republicans will “go along with” the $1.8 trillion White House stimulus proposal despite their vocal pushback.



Lawrence Kudlow wearing a suit and tie: Trump economic adviser: Senate Republicans will 'go along with' White House stimulus proposal despite their pushback


© Aaron Schwartz
Trump economic adviser: Senate Republicans will ‘go along with’ White House stimulus proposal despite their pushback

Kudlow told CNN’s “State of the Union” that the White House expects GOP support from Republicans in the upper chamber. A source told The Hill on Saturday that several senators expressed “significant concerns” about the proposal’s cost in a call with administration officials.

The White House economic adviser said on Sunday he does not think the coronavirus stimulus bill is “dead.”

“Don’t forget, Republicans in the Senate put up their own bill a few weeks ago and got 53 votes, I think it was, so they united,” he said. “I think if an agreement can be reached, they will go along with it.”

Kudlow also criticized Democrats, including Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), for their “intransigence” over funding unemployment assistance, small business loans and stimulus checks in individual bills or an overall bill.

“Well, I’m not talking about your Democratic friends,” CNN host Jake Tapper pushed back. “I’m talking about 20 Senate Republicans who were mad at Secretary Mnuchin and saying that the proposal of $1.8 trillion was way too much.”

The White House economic adviser noted the president would “go beyond” the cost of the current proposal to fund assistance for unemployed people, small business loans and stimulus checks.

“I think if we could get this thing settled on the Democrat side, we will get it settled on the Republican side,” he said. “There will still be further efforts of negotiation perhaps today but certainly this coming week.”

“The D’s are holding this thing up,” he added.

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The Senate seats most likely to flip parties in November

The Senate seats most likely to flip parties in November

With less than a month until Election Day, Democrats are picking up momentum toward winning the Senate majority: Challengers are outraising Republican incumbents, and they are leading in polls. They’ve been helped along by Democrat Joe Biden’s widening lead over President Donald Trump, and some Senate Republicans seeking to distance themselves at the last minute from Trump, after spending years backing him.

But anything could happen. Like this: the revelation of an affair involving the Democratic nominee in one of the most pivotal states, North Carolina, as many voters there are casting ballots. And an increase in mail voting carries with it the risk that voters who don’t fill out their ballots correctly won’t be able to vote at all.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

Democrats need a net gain of at least four Senate seats to win the majority, or a Biden presidency and three net wins, which would give the vice president the deciding vote in any ties.

Democrats have a chance in a dozen of the 14 races on this list, but some are in solid Republican territory. We removed the reelection campaign of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., from our rankings – he’s ahead of Democratic challenger Amy McGrath despite the tens of millions of dollars she’s raised to make it competitive.

Here are the top races most likely to flip parties, categorized and ranked from most to least likely.

– More likely to flip than not: Alabama, Colorado and Arizona.

1. Alabama (Democratic-held): There are no changes to the top of our list. Sen. Doug Jones, D-Ala., remains the most vulnerable senator of 2020. He’s running for reelection in one of the most pro-Trump states in the nation. And unlike in 2017, he’s not going up against a seriously flawed Republican opponent. Former Auburn University football coach Tommy Tuberville

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