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New Mexico loses ground in COVID-19 spread fight

New Mexico loses ground in COVID-19 spread fight

SANTA FE, N.M. — New Mexico is losing ground in efforts to contain the spread of COVID-19 as newly reported daily infections hit a record of 488 cases.

Three additional deaths from the pandemic also were disclosed Friday by state health officials as fatalities from the pandemic surpassed 900.

Bernalillo County, with the state’s most populous urban area, accounted for 135 new cases, while Dona Ana had 81. Lea and Chaves counties together accounted for 77 new cases.

The state’s infection and positivity rates for the spread of the virus are climbing as the administration of Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham holds the line on emergency public health restrictions.


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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— President Trump credits antibody drug for quick recovery

— Spain declares state of emergency in Madrid to contain surge

— As virus fills French ICUs anew, doctors ask what went wrong

— British government will announce more support for businesses to retain staff in the coming months if they are forced to close because of lockdown restrictions.

— President Donald Trump says he wants to try to hold a campaign rally in Florida on Saturday, despite his recent COVID-19 diagnosis.

— Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — Enrolled members of the Navajo Nation will be eligible for payments of up to $1,500 as part of the tribe’s response to the coronavirus.

President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer on Friday approved the $49 million plan adopted by the tribal council. The funding comes from the tribe’s share of federal coronavirus relief funding.

Adults will be eligible for payments of $1,500 while minors are eligible for $500.

Nez said in a statement that there isn’t enough funding to

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Kentucky’s small colleges have had to get creative to limit the spread of COVID-19.

Kentucky’s small colleges have had to get creative to limit the spread of COVID-19.

Hitting pause on in-person classes was the best way for University of Pikeville officials to get ahead of a growing COVID-19 cluster.

Pikeville President Burton Webb said the university was running out of beds — not for the 32 confirmed student cases during the late September spike — but for the more than 80 who had been exposed to the virus and needed quarantine, leading to the halting of in-person classes last month. Students will begin returning on Saturday.

Unlike their larger, public university counterparts, which can stretch larger budgets to monitor their several thousands of students, Kentucky’s small, private colleges have to work with less cash and less resources. But to many small college administrators, their size gives them a number of key strengths in their fight against COVID-19: An ability to pivot quickly if things aren’t working, and in some cases, the ability to widely test nearly the entire student body.

“We’re a rural, small college that operates on a tight budget, but we’re doing the best we can,” Webb said.

How have Kentucky’s small colleges handled COVID-19?

Kentucky’s small colleges have had varying degrees of success mitigating the spread of the virus among students.

Commonwealth Baptist College on Versailles Road has had the most cases among private colleges in Fayette County with 77 since March — 70 of those cases have come since students moved into the college in mid-August, Lexington-Fayette County Health Department spokesperson Kevin Hall said. It’s unclear how large the school’s enrollment is. Jeffery Fugate is the president of the college. He also pastors Clays Mill Baptist Church in Jessamine County, which health officials labeled as a COVID-19 hot spot in June. Fugate disputed that anyone had contracted the virus at the church.

According to its COVID dashboard, Union College in Barbourville, had

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