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State and city leaders blame social gatherings, not businesses or schools, for coronavirus uptick in New London

State and city leaders blame social gatherings, not businesses or schools, for coronavirus uptick in New London

Connecticut and local officials said Monday that the recent uptick in coronavirus cases in New London can be traced back to a series of social gatherings and other small social interactions — not to local school or business reopenings, or to the nearby casinos.

“We’re being told by the contact tracers that it’s not coming from any institutional or business setting, it’s coming predominantly from social spread … where people are letting their guard down,” said New London Mayor Michael Passero.

He pointed to situations — such as small family gatherings that are well within the state limits on gathering size — where people may feel relaxed enough that they remove their masks or sit nearby one another. But COVID-19 can still spread, even among a small group of people and even from people who aren’t displaying any symptoms.

“The institutional environments — nursing homes, schools, even the casino — they have these strict protocols in place, people are less likely to let their guard down,” Passero said. “So where it’s spreading now is where people are more likely to be relaxed and let their guard down.”

The state issued a COVID-19 alert for New London on Thursday, after a steep increase in cases in the city. New London and the surrounding areas saw relatively few cases in the spring, and by Sept. 25 New London had recorded a total of 229 confirmed or probable COVID-19 cases since the pandemic began in March. But from Sept. 25 to Oct. 9, New London’s cases jumped up to 368 — an increase of 139 in just two weeks.

The reported cause of the New London uptick align with comments made by Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, during a visit to UConn’s Hartford campus last week.

“This is really

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Nearly three times more COVID deaths in Mississippi’s for-profit nursing homes, analysis shows | State Government

Nearly three times more COVID deaths in Mississippi’s for-profit nursing homes, analysis shows | State Government

Twice as many residents caught COVID-19 at Mississippi’s for-profit nursing homes, and nearly three times more died there, an analysis of health data by the Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting shows.

The average number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in these for-profit homes? Four in 10 residents.

One possible factor: 80% of Mississippi’s nursing homes had already been cited for infection-control problems before the pandemic hit.

Charlene Harrington, a professor emeritus at the University of California at San Francisco who discovered similar results in a just-released study of nursing homes in California, said the current pandemic is exposing problems that have persisted for decades. “We’ve just looked the other way for 30 years,” she said.

OSHA has been investigating three nursing homes in Mississippi, all of them for-profit, for workplace catastrophes or fatalities, including Lakeside Health & Rehabilitation Center in Quitman. One of the home’s nursing assistants, Carole Faye Doby of Stonewall, died of COVID May 15, and two residents also died of the disease.

A week or more before she contracted the coronavirus, Doby warned her family that “things were getting bad at the nursing home, and that we didn’t need to come around,” recalled her daughter, Shenika Jackson of Clinton.

She said her mother shared that a fellow worker and a resident (who later died) had both come down with the disease.

On May 6, Doby was tested for COVID. Days later, they saw her on Mother’s Day, Jackson said. “We did see her on Sunday, Mother’s Day. We sat outside the porch and ate lunch. She was inside the window.”

By May 11, her mother still didn’t have results and continued to get sicker so she saw a doctor, who had her rushed to the hospital by ambulance, Jackson said.

Because of COVID, she couldn’t visit with her

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Florida State fights, falls short at No. 5 Notre Dame

Florida State fights, falls short at No. 5 Notre Dame

Curt Weiler
 
| Tallahassee Democrat

SOUTH BEND, Ind. – Florida State entered Saturday looking to build upon its first positive momentum of the season.

It didn’t show up in the win column, but the Seminoles looked like a totally different team on offense facing a tough Notre Dame defense.

The Seminoles — who managed a total of 23 points in their first two games against FBS opponents this season — nearly matched that total in the first quarter alone against the Fighting Irish.

No. 5 ND (3-0, 2-0 in ACC) proved to be too much in the end, running away with a 42-26 win over the Seminoles (1-3, 0-3 in ACC) in front of a reduced crowd of 10,409 fans at Notre Dame Stadium, but it was an effort the Seminoles look to be able to build upon.

Making his first career start, FSU quarterback Jordan Travis led FSU to an early 3-0 lead off an ND turnover and a 17-14 lead at the end of the first quarter.

More: Final: Florida State falls 42-26 at No. 5 Notre Dame

More: Dick Vitale book on ‘Lost’ 2020 men’s basketball season has happy ending for Seminoles

The Irish took the lead back on the first possession of the second quarter and held it for good from there, but the Seminoles hung around into the closing minutes, battling a great deal more than they did two weeks ago at Miami.

The good news was that the Seminoles amassed 405 yards of offense against a stifling Notre Dame defense. The bad news was that they allowed Notre Dame to rack up 554.

Jordan Travis has brought the FSU offense to life

It was easy to excuse away what Travis did in FSU’s win over Jacksonville State due to the talent level of the

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Analysis: Taking a page from authoritarians, Trump turns power of the state against political rivals

Analysis: Taking a page from authoritarians, Trump turns power of the state against political rivals

President Donald Trump’s order to his secretary of state to declassify thousands of Hillary Clinton’s emails, along with his insistence that his attorney general issue indictments against Barack Obama and Joe Biden, takes his presidency into new territory — until now, occupied by leaders with names like Putin, Xi and Erdogan.

Trump has long demanded — quite publicly, often on Twitter — that his most senior Cabinet members use the power of their office to pursue political enemies. But his appeals last week, as he trailed badly in the polls and was desperate to turn the national conversation away from the coronavirus, were so blatant that one had to look to authoritarian nations to make comparisons.

He took a step even Richard Nixon avoided in his most desperate days: openly ordering direct immediate government action against specific opponents, timed to serve his reelection campaign.

“There is essentially no precedent,” said Jack Goldsmith, who led the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel under President George W. Bush and has written extensively on presidential powers. “We have a norm that developed after Watergate that presidents don’t talk about ongoing investigations, much less interfere with them.”

“It is crazy and it is unprecedented,” said Goldsmith, now a professor at Harvard Law School, “but it’s no different from what he has been saying since the beginning of his presidency. The only thing new is that he has moved from talking about it to seeming to order it.”

Trump’s vision of the presidency has always leaned to exercising the absolute powers of the chief executive, a writ-large version of the family business he presided over. “I have an Article II,” he told young adults last year at a Turning Point USA summit, referring to the section of the Constitution that deals with the president’s powers,

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Iowa State football vs. Texas Tech: Pregame analysis, prediction

Iowa State football vs. Texas Tech: Pregame analysis, prediction

Ben Visser, correspondent

AMES — A closer look at Saturday’s Big 12 football game between No. 24 Iowa State (2-1, 2-0) and Texas Tech (1-2, 0-2) at Jack Trice Stadium in Ames. Kickoff is 2:30 p.m. (ABC).

Iowa State offense


In Iowa State’s two conference games, the rushing attack has gotten stronger as the game has gone on.


Against TCU, Breece Hall and Kene Nwangwu combined for 129 rushing yards in the second half and, against Oklahoma, Hall rushed for 100 yards in the second half.


“I think the last two games you’ve got to give a little bit of credit to the coaching staff making the right adjustments to put the guys in the right situations to be successful,” ISU Coach Matt Campbell said. “Then I think you’ve got to give a lot of credit to our kids. I think they’ve done a great job preparing to play four quarters. I think their mentality and their ability to play four quarters has certainly given (us) an opportunity to find success within the scheme.


“I think that’s more of a collective whole and we’ll see if that continues as the season progresses.”

Iowa State defense


The Cyclones’ front seven continues to play impressive football. Oklahoma averaged just 3.5 yards per rush. TCU was at 2.3 and Louisiana averaged 3.4.


The front seven demolished TCU’s offensive line to the tune of six sacks and it followed that up with another impressive performance against Oklahoma. Iowa State recorded two sacks against the Sooners while going against one of the best offensive lines in the Big 12 and facing a mobile quarterback in Spencer Rattler.


The area of concern for the ISU defense is in the secondary.

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In three games, the

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