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Carbon dioxide emissions may not surpass 2019 levels until 2027: analysis

Carbon dioxide emissions may not surpass 2019 levels until 2027: analysis

Global carbon dioxide emissions are expected to increase after the pandemic, but may not exceed 2019 levels until 2027, according to a projection from the International Energy Agency (IEA). 

Demand for energy has decreased since the start of the pandemic for reasons including reduced air and vehicle travel. 

The IEA, which pushes for a “sustainable energy future”, projects a 7 percent drop in energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in 2020 amid reductions in fossil fuel use. 

The analysis predicted a decline in annual CO2 emissions to where they were a decade ago. However, it says there “may not have been” a similar fall in emissions of methane, a more powerful greenhouse gas. 

Under an IEA model based on today’s current energy policies in which the pandemic comes under control in 2021, the global economy will return to its pre-pandemic level in 2021 and energy demand will return by early 2023 but emissions won’t exceed 2019 levels until 2027. 

Energy demand will recover faster than the rate of emissions because renewables will make up a greater share of the market, while the use of coal will decline, according to the model. 

In 2020, the report estimates that global energy demand will drop by 5 percent and energy investment will drop by 18 percent. 

Specifically, demand for oil is expected to drop 8 percent while coal use is expected to drop 7 percent. Natural gas demand is slated to drop 3 percent while renewables grow slightly. 

In the long term, the report projects that under this scenario coal will remain about 8 percent lower than pre-coronavirus levels through 2030, while oil demand is expected to recover by 2023 but plateau after 2030. 

It projects that natural gas will increase by 14 percent over 2019 levels by 2030. 

While the slowdown in emissions increases

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China Box Office Poised to Surpass U.S. as World’s Largest Moviegoing Market Amid Pandemic

China Box Office Poised to Surpass U.S. as World’s Largest Moviegoing Market Amid Pandemic

China’s patriotic “My People, My Homeland” has grossed $325 million as of Monday evening local time, earning more money in less than two weeks than the $323 million that Christopher Nolan’s “Tenet” has grossed globally in over a month, according to data from Maoyan and Box Office Mojo.

This weekend, the total China box office hit $68 million, once again far surpassing sales in North America, where cinemas earned less than $9.5 million. To date, the Chinese box office has grossed $1.9 billion so far in 2020. The tally puts China now neck-and-neck with the North American market’s year-to-date earnings of $2.08 billion, according to Comscore. (Both markets are down 76% year-on-year.)

Cinema-going is on the rise in China as the pandemic remains under control, with strong local films set to release in the remainder of the year. Meanwhile, U.S. theaters are heading for trouble as Hollywood studio tentpoles drop off the calendar and the coronavirus continues to rage across the states. Given these factors, it now seems inevitable that the Middle Kingdom will soon surpass the U.S. as the world’s largest film market in 2020.

The performance of “My People, My Homeland” demonstrates the extent to which China’s market has recovered in the wake of COVID-19 and remains robust enough to send local tentpoles too jingoistic to entice audiences abroad nonetheless soaring to great heights.

Produced by “Wolf Warrior 2” and “The Wandering Earth” studio Beijing Culture, the film once again led the box office this weekend with sizable sales of $38.2 million, according to figures from consultancy Artisan Gateway. The omnibus title features five shorts from a who’s who of China’s most bankable directors: Ning Hao (“Crazy Alien”), Xu Zheng (“Lost in Russia”), Chen Sicheng (“Detective Chinatown 3”), Yan Fei and Peng Damo (“Hello Mr. Billionaire”), Deng Chao

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US family health insurance premiums surpass $21,000 before the pandemic

US family health insurance premiums surpass $21,000 before the pandemic

The average premium for family coverage in employer health plans is up about 4% this year to more than $21,000 — and employers are picking up more of the tab.



A man gets a flu shot at a health facility in Washington, D.C Jan. 31, 2020.


© EVA HAMBACH/AFP/Getty Images North America/TNS
A man gets a flu shot at a health facility in Washington, D.C Jan. 31, 2020.

Workers on average aren’t being asked to pay more in premiums for family coverage and those with individual coverage through their work aren’t seeing increases in deductibles, according survey results Thursday from the California-based Kaiser Family Foundation.

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The findings speak to the stability of health benefits in the pre-pandemic economy when employers were competing for talent in a tight labor market, said Matthew Rae, an associate director at the foundation, which has surveyed employers on health plan costs for 22 years. Obviously, the current labor market is vastly different, Rae noted, with last month’s unemployment rate roughly twice the comparable figure last year.

“The premiums and health plans that we were asking about were plans that employers were setting a year ago when we had historically low unemployment,” Rae said.

“I would expect that not that many employers are going to make huge changes in the generosity of their plans over the next couple of months,” he said. “But the economic situation is really hard to put your finger on. It could be that employers will have to think about the generosity of their plans if they are really facing a lot of other costs.”

The Kaiser Family Foundation survey tacks trends in the market for employer-sponsored health plans, which provide coverage for more than 150 million Americans. Employer coverage is the largest single source of insurance in the U.S., with more enrollees than the federal Medicare program.

When Kaiser first surveyed employers on premium costs

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U.S. family health insurance premiums surpass $21,000

U.S. family health insurance premiums surpass $21,000

The average premium for family coverage in employer health plans is up about 4% this year to more than $21,000 — and employers are picking up more of the tab.

Workers on average aren’t being asked to pay more in premiums for family coverage and those with individual coverage through their work aren’t seeing increases in deductibles, according survey results Thursday from the California-based Kaiser Family Foundation.

The findings speak to the stability of health benefits in the pre-pandemic economy when employers were competing for talent in a tight labor market, said Matthew Rae, an associate director at the foundation, which has surveyed employers on health plan costs for 22 years. Obviously, the current labor market is vastly different, Rae noted, with last month’s unemployment rate roughly twice the comparable figure last year.

“The premiums and health plans that we were asking about were plans that employers were setting a year ago when we had historically low unemployment,” Rae said.

“I would expect that not that many employers are going to make huge changes in the generosity of their plans over the next couple of months,” he said. “But the economic situation is really hard to put your finger on. It could be that employers will have to think about the generosity of their plans if they are really facing a lot of other costs.”

The Kaiser Family Foundation survey tacks trends in the market for employer-sponsored health plans, which provide coverage for more than 150 million Americans. Employer coverage is the largest single source of insurance in the U.S., with more enrollees than the federal Medicare program.

When Kaiser first surveyed employers on premium costs in 1999, the average premium for family coverage was $5,791 — a fraction of this year’s average cost of $21,342. Just since 2010, family

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