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Thinking about buying stock in DouYu, Adamis Pharmaceuticals, Altimmune, FuelCell Energy, or Ovid Therapeutics?

Thinking about buying stock in DouYu, Adamis Pharmaceuticals, Altimmune, FuelCell Energy, or Ovid Therapeutics?

Thinking about buying stock in DouYu, Adamis Pharmaceuticals, Altimmune, FuelCell Energy, or Ovid Therapeutics?

Thinking about buying stock in DouYu, Adamis Pharmaceuticals, Altimmune, FuelCell Energy, or Ovid Therapeutics?

PR Newswire

NEW YORK, Oct. 12, 2020

NEW YORK, Oct. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — InvestorsObserver issues critical PriceWatch Alerts for DOYU, ADMP, ALT, FCEL, and OVID.



To see how InvestorsObserver’s proprietary scoring system rates these stocks, view the InvestorsObserver’s PriceWatch Alert by selecting the corresponding link.

(Note: You may have to copy this link into your browser then press the [ENTER] key.)

InvestorsObserver’s PriceWatch Alerts are based on our proprietary scoring methodology. Each stock is evaluated based on short-term technical, long-term technical and fundamental factors. Each of those scores is then combined into an overall score that determines a stock’s overall suitability for investment.


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SOURCE InvestorsObserver

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Dawn breaks on a new age of economic thinking

Dawn breaks on a new age of economic thinking

The deepest economic crises are also crucibles for new economic thinking. The Depression led to Keynesian macroeconomics. The second world war cemented support for the welfare state and the mixed economy. The inflationary 1970s and the oil shocks propelled free-market ideas to power.

We should expect the coronavirus pandemic, which amounts to the greatest peacetime economic disruption in living memory, also to lead to big shifts in the consensus on what is good economic policy. To see the direction of change, look to that guardian of economic orthodoxy, the IMF.

Every year, in the lead-up to its annual meetings — the 2020 forum is about to start — it publishes the “analytical chapters” of its flagship publications. The growth forecasts issued at the meetings are what will hit the headlines. But the underlying analyses often provide deeper insight into changing economic conditions and the shifting realities of economic policymaking.

IMF economists are hardly at the forefront of radicalism, but they have often shown the way once the world’s economic policymaking elites are ready to move. In the past decade, IMF research has lent authority to several reversals of the pre-existing consensus (and its own previous views), such as giving qualified approval to capital controls and upgrading the effectiveness of fiscal stimulus. It has played down the harm it expects from high public debt. In each case the IMF imprimatur has made it easier for national governments to shift policy in the indicated direction.

So what is the fund’s thinking today? Its three latest analytical chapters are all noteworthy. The fund’s Fiscal Monitor analyses public investment, which has been on a downward trend since the start of the millennium. Its researchers find that, provided it is well-directed, public investment is particularly powerful in uncertain times. The most striking effect is

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MoffettNathanson cuts box-office view, urges creative thinking for theaters (NYSE:CNK)

MoffettNathanson cuts box-office view, urges creative thinking for theaters (NYSE:CNK)

MoffettNathanson is joining in with analysts cutting U.S. box-office projections, pointing to a murky view of when attendance can recover.

As with MKM Partners earlier, it expects 2020 domestic box office will be down 81%.

That brings liquidity concerns back to the forefront for exhibitors.

MoffettNathanson is recommending some “flexibility” when it comes to release window arrangements as an incentive to getting films back into theaters. And it’s urging possible deals with subscription video-on-demand services like Netflix (NFLX +0.8%) and Amazon.com (AMZN +2.9%) as a source of product. (AMC has pointed to the revenue share from its landmark release-window deal with Universal as one of the reasons it can keep theaters open even as more movie releases get delayed.)

MoffettNathanson is maintaining a Neutral on Cinemark (CNK -3.4%), which it says is in the strongest liquidity position among theaters, but it’s cutting its price target to $12 from $16. AMC (AMC -1.8%) and Cineworld (OTC:CNWGY) were “overleveraged” even before the pandemic crisis began, it says.

Other theater stocks: IMAX +0.5%; Marcus (NYSE:MCS) +1%; Reading International (NASDAQ:RDI) -3.8%; National CineMedia (NASDAQ:NCMI) -4.3%; Cineplex (OTCPK:CPXGF) -6.3%.

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The Economic Thinking Behind It Is

The Economic Thinking Behind It Is

Over the past forty years, business has worshipped at the altar of economic efficiency. Beneath countless management fads and trends have been three simple goals: cut costs, grow profits, and increase share price.

On the surface, this calculated agenda looks inarguably smart, providing the seemingly perfect engine for economic expansion. But just below the surface lies a dark side of using these narrow goals to make complex and messy decisions: when decoupled from a moral foundation, they tear at our social fabric.

Free market economists have helped lead this decoupling process. For years they’ve argued the best way to organize a prosperous and healthy society is to let individuals maximize their own financial self-interests through private markets. Collective selfishness, they contend, leads an “invisible hand” to guide society down the right path as competition dynamically optimizes for the best outcomes.

There are two problems with this argument. First, the US economy isn’t as competitive or free as some would have us believe, with much of the inefficiency advantage going to corporate interests and never really “trickling down” to the rest of society. Second, aggregated short-term private selfishness doesn’t actually produce long-term public good. In theory, that’s why we have government to intervene. Herein lies the challenge.

Over the past several decades government has neglected to play a proper balancing role in capitalist markets, instead jumping into bed with free market economists. Politicians have largely avoided making difficult decisions on tough topics such as climate change, inequality, stagnant wages, and common-sense financial regulation. In essence, they’ve cut a Faustian bargain by letting the fiction of an invisible hand pick-pocket our long-term future in order to drive short-term growth. To make matters worse, the spoils from this unholy bargain are accruing to an increasingly small percentage

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