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A global strategy chief shares 3 ways investors can navigate increased stock-market volatility in the coming months

A global strategy chief shares 3 ways investors can navigate increased stock-market volatility in the coming months

trader Gregory Rowe
NYSE trader Gregory Rowe works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange at the end of the trading day.


  • Willem Sels, HSBC Private Banking global chief market strategist, expects volatility to pick up in the next few months due to the US election and a renewed uptick of COVID-19 cases. 
  • In a Tuesday email he shared three strategies for how investors can manage the stock market volatility ahead. 
  • One of his strategies is to avoid the lure of low-quality stocks just because they’re cheap.  Instead, Sels said to seek out companies with strong balance sheets and long-term growth potential.

The upcoming US election and an uptick in cases of COVID-19 are leading to increased volatility and causing some investors to step back. Willem Sels, HSBC Private Banking global chief market strategist, expects volatility to pick up in the next few months, but said investors should remain in the market. In a Tuesday email he shared three strategies for investors to manage what’s ahead. 

1. Focus on quality assets

“What the September correction has shown is that, when valuations are high, it is unwise to go into lower quality assets just because they are cheaper,” Sels said. Investors should seek out companies with strong balance sheets as COVID-19 will continue to weigh on cash flows for longer than expected. For long-term growth, Sels is watching companies related to climate change, health technology, 5G, and the online economy.

2. Look for areas with promising growth

Sels also said he’s looking for areas with “promising growth” in the short and long term. “The US economic outlook currently looks better than in Europe, and data in China and Korea is more positive than in other EM countries,” he added.

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Making new friends during a pandemic can be almost impossible for kids. But school staff are finding creative ways to help. – News – providencejournal.com

Making new friends during a pandemic can be almost impossible for kids. But school staff are finding creative ways to help. – News – providencejournal.com

It was a tough day for a 6-year-old. And her mom. Imagine being a first grader in a new school and unable to participate in “Best Friends” day.

Nikki Bourgeois went on Facebook not to complain but to share what it was like for her daughter Mackenna, a brand new Somerset, trying to make friends in remote-learning mode.

“Makenna didn’t have anyone that she could talk about. It was a bit heartbreaking,” Nikki wrote in the post on Oct. 2. “We don’t know anyone in the area, and without her being physically in school, she isn’t able to meet any friends. We have been told that there are kids in the neighborhood that are her age, but we have yet to meet anyone. COVID-19 didn’t help either.”

The social and psychological needs for some students have become a challenge to meet in this COVID-fear-wracked world. Making friendships online doesn’t compare to old-school in-school, face-to-face socializing. And even in the on-site half of hybrid learning, masks and social distancing can reduce the ability of an elementary school age child to make friends, something that is critical for the pre-K through grade 5 set.

Schools and teachers know better than most about this 2020 challenge. And they’re taking action.

Susan Darmody of Westport is a second-grade teacher at the Silvia Elementary School on Meridian Street in Fall River. She’s starting this school year teaching in full remote. Silvia has a mix of remote and hybrid students.

“Tougher for the remote kids,” Darmody said in a text message to The Herald News. “Hybrid kids do a lot of activities with their teachers using social distance in the classroom. Games and outside doing mask breaks. But (the children) are so happy to be in school.

“A few ways we help make the kids feel

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Three Ways Insurance Companies Need To Rethink The Role Of Agents

Three Ways Insurance Companies Need To Rethink The Role Of Agents

Founder and CEO of SmartFinancial.com: on a mission to make the insurance buying process more efficient.

It used to be that if you asked someone who they’re insured with, they’d give you their insurance agent’s name. Billions of dollars in advertising later, people now name their carrier and barely remember the agent that signed them on. Meanwhile, the brick and mortar agencies are waning in importance, and companies like Nationwide are moving to a virtual workforce model. In my role as a CEO overseeing an insurance-technology platform, I’ve observed one thing that remains the same despite all the confusing shifts over the past few decades: Insurance agents are still the primary sales channel for insurers.

Even though carriers can communicate directly with consumers at a lower cost, insurance agents who bring profitable business to carriers are a valued and integral part of the insurance distribution chain. Here’s how future trends will likely shape the carrier-agent-customer relationship and what carriers can do to stay ahead of the curve.

1. Support agents in their role as advisers.

We see a future where insurance agents become more specialized in various niche insurance products. Agents will bring more value to the relationship with the customer by understanding and explaining coverage options on more complex policies. The agent’s role will also become much more of an advisory role that goes beyond the traditional aim of selling insurance products. Because agents are on the front lines serving customers, they will be expected to demonstrate expertise, not only about the insurance products they sell, but also the many ancillary services that insurance carriers are increasingly offering to add value to their insurance products. Car loans, home loans, cybersecurity prevention and other services will become standard package offerings. And someone has to service them. That’s why it’s

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Ways small shops shifting holiday sales amid COVID-19

Ways small shops shifting holiday sales amid COVID-19

Watty Brooks Hall, the owner of the Brooks Collection, plans to keep her iPhone charged and ready for more FaceTime calls this holiday season.

Her Collierville, Tennessee gift shop introduced virtual shopping for consumers who don’t feel comfortable coming inside but want to see the pottery, gifts and home goods up close. Hall also plans to post more photos on Instagram and Facebook where engagement has been up since the pandemic.

Texas-based Stag Provisions also is engaging more with shoppers on social media. It will also stock more comfortable clothes such as t-shirts and sweatpants this holiday season as people continue to spend a lot of time at home. 

And Gibson’s Bookstore, New Hampshire’s oldest independent book shop established in 1898, hopes to drive online sales with its new curbside pickup option.

Small retailers across the country have had to get creative to keep the lights on after dealing with temporary closures and restrictions amid the coronavirus pandemic. Now they’re preparing for a holiday shopping season unlike any they have ever experienced.

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National retailers are amping up the pressure with earlier promotions to spread through the season, but small stores may benefit because of their size and ability to personalize the shopping experience.

“We deliver. We ship. We do curbside,” Hall said, adding her shop near Memphis doesn’t sell merchandise on its website. “It’s just trying to keep a small business alive is what it boils down to.”

COVID-19 relief needed: Your favorite restaurant or small business – as many as 36,000 – face closure without coronavirus relief

Small business advice: Not all business changes need to be big, sometimes a good pivot is small, thoughtful and consistent

The Brooks Collection introduced virtual shopping

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Bills fans finding creative ways to watch Tuesday’s game

Bills fans finding creative ways to watch Tuesday’s game

LOCKPORT, N.Y. (WIVB) — Some Bills fans hoping to head down to Tennessee to cheer for the team in person changed their minds after the recent scheduling woes.

Although the Titans are allowing more than 8,600 fans inside Nissan Stadium, many decided against traveling after the what ifs and back and forth whether the game would still be on.

Nick Giammusso is the president of VIP Tix, an organization that allows people to buy and sell tickets to events like football games. He says just a few weeks ago people were contacting him to head to Nashville.

“It seems like just a few weeks ago we were getting a lot of calls, fielding a lot of calls, and then with the uncertainty of the date, things just kind of leveled off,” Giammusso told News 4.

But Bills fans still want to be able to watch the game while also staying safe, so they’re finding creative ways to cheer on the team.

People can head to Lockport and break out the charcoal grills and folding tables. The Transit Drive-In is allowing people to tailgate and stay for the game. Strict safety protocols will be in place, however, with parking at roughly 50-percent capacity.

“The game is going to be projected on the largest outdoor screen in New York State with the brightest projector in the world, and it’s going to be incredible,” said owner Rick Cohen. “All from the comfort of your car, or you can sit outside in lawn chairs, as long as you stay within your group and social distance, everyone will have a safe and fun time.”

Marlee Tuskes is a reporter who has been part of the News 4 team since 2019. See more of her work here.

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