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Smartly.io Named Pinterest Creative Partner for Offering Advertisers Creative at Scale

Smartly.io Named Pinterest Creative Partner for Offering Advertisers Creative at Scale

Creative automation and on-demand services empower brands to grow Pinterest advertising

Smartly.io, the leading social advertising automation platform for designers and performance marketers, today announced they are an official Creative Partner for Pinterest, showcasing the value of Smartly.io Creative Studio team and the company’s creative automation offerings. Already a Pinterest Advertising Partner, Smartly.io is now able to help Pinterest marketers develop and scale highly visual and engaging creative. The Smartly.io Creative Studio partners directly with brands to produce original mobile-first creatives, transform existing assets into short-form content built for social, conduct robust testing to find and scale winning creatives, and drive business results.

As consumer behavior evolves and social channels continue to become more intertwined with our daily lives, it’s vital that marketers connect with customers in new ways. Pinterest, which surpassed 400 million monthly active users this year, has become a go-to for consumers leading into the holiday season. This has created a clear opportunity for brands to diversify their marketing mix and adopt a multi-platform approach to advertising. To produce on-brand and engaging creative that is platform-specific requires the right framework, expertise, and experience — a combination of resources that many brands are looking for today. With Smartly.io Creative Studio’s set of on-demand services, brands can successfully capitalize on the high buyer intent found on Pinterest.

“As a highly visual platform where users are in search of inspiration with a buying mindset, Pinterest is a strategic choice for brands,” said Kristo Ovaska, CEO and Co-Founder of Smartly.io. “On Pinterest, the level of friction between identifying a need or desire and ultimately making a purchase is relatively low. By embracing Pinterest as a performance channel and investing in strong creative, marketers across industries can capture consumer attention during the busiest shopping time of the year.”

“Our partnership

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Facebook letting advertisers sow climate denialism: analysis

Facebook letting advertisers sow climate denialism: analysis

Facebook is allowing climate misinformation ads to proliferate despite claiming it is committed to rooting out the problem, a new report by a think tank said Thursday.

InfluenceMap used the platform’s own data to identify 51 ads denying the link between human activity and climate change that were viewed a total of eight million times over the first half of 2020.

This was despite the fact that Facebook bans false ads, and stated as recently as September that it is “committed to tackling climate change through our global operations.”

Out of the 51 ads identified, only one was removed by the social media giant while the rest were allowed to run for the entirety of their scheduled campaign.

Two ran until the end of September.

Reacting to the new report, US Senator Elizabeth Warren told the think tank: “InfluenceMap’s devastating report reinforces and reveals how Facebook lets climate deniers spread dangerous junk to millions of people.

“We have repeatedly asked Facebook to close the loopholes that allow misinformation to run rampant on its platform, but its leadership would rather make a quick buck while our planet burns, sea levels rise, and communities – disproportionately Black and Brown – suffer.”

Warren was among four Senators from the Democratic party who wrote to the platform in July asking that it “close the loopholes that let climate disinformation spread on their platforms.”

The report found that four well known conservative US groups were behind the bulk of the advertising, and received funding from donor-advised trusts that allow them to conceal the source of the income.

A total of nine advertisers identified in the report collectively spent $42,000 for the 51 ads reaching eight million views.

The disinformation was most likely to be seen by men over 55 in rural US states, with the

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