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Your health insurance might be on the chopping block

Your health insurance might be on the chopping block

Too bad there is not another presidential debate this week. The moderator would be able to ask the most important question of our time: When it comes to a comprehensive health insurance program, which is better: ObamaCare or what the Trump administration has proposed to replace it with? 

It’s a trick question, because to date, after four years of promising a better health insurance plan, there is no Trump administration plan.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), better known as ObamaCare, which passed in 2010, extended coverage to millions of uninsured Americans by expanding Medicaid. Thirty-nine states have since elected to expand eligibility. For others not covered by their employer’s plan, new health insurance exchanges were created to allow individuals to buy health insurance.

Additionally, the ACA set federal standards for health insurers that offer plans to individuals, small groups as well as employer-sponsored health benefit plans.  For the first time, these standards under current law prohibit insurers from: 1) denying coverage to those with pre-existing conditions; and 2) excluding adult children up to age 26 from their parents’ plan. 

Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpDes Moines mayor says he’s worried about coronavirus spread at Trump rally Judiciary Committee Democrats pen second letter to DOJ over Barrett disclosures: ‘raises more questions that it answers’ Trump asks campaign to schedule daily events for him until election: report MORE vowed to repeal the ACA and replace it with something better.  Trump has asked Americans to trust him to do this rather than developing or proposing an insurance alternative. Instead he has issued executive orders that apply only to people who already have health insurance (e.g. permitting states to pursue lowering drug costs and expanding the kind of health expenses that can be deducted from one’s health savings account; expanding access to telehealth). 

Promising to

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How to Get Past Writer’s Block and Other Creative Ruts

How to Get Past Writer’s Block and Other Creative Ruts



a drawing of a cartoon character: How to Get Past Writer's Block and Other Creative Ruts


© Getty Images
How to Get Past Writer’s Block and Other Creative Ruts

Proven strategies to help unblock any creative process–whether it’s writing, rapping, or software entrepreneurship.

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Creative projects can be some of the most rewarding and frustrating things.

Whether you’re trying to build a software company or make a rap song with a music video, a lot of creativity is required.

Oddly enough, the more creative the project, the messier it tends to get. Sometimes it’s hard to even get started. Other times, it’s easy to start but feels impossible to finish.

In the past decade, I’ve written thousands of articles and sales email templates. I founded a profitable copywriting company that trained and employed dozens of writers, who all struggled with writer’s block at various times. I also created lucrative educational courses and built software for enterprise technology companies.

And, in the past year, I even wrote and recorded over a dozen rap songs. I also directed and self-produced music videos for some of these songs.

Through all these endeavors, I’ve learned a lot about creative processes–both for solo projects and highly collaborative ones. I know what separates the productive and successful ones from those that get stuck and go nowhere.

Here are some tips to help you overcome creative bottlenecks, whatever you’re working on.

Break it into smaller pieces

Creative projects are often large and complex, and that can be daunting. An easy way to fix this is taking a moment to think about all the required steps in your project, and then breaking it into bite-size chunks. This makes everything less intimidating, and can also help you avoid analysis paralysis and procrastination.

Set a timer and make deadlines

Perfectionism is like

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Federal appeals court rejects Trump’s efforts to block access to financial records

Federal appeals court rejects Trump’s efforts to block access to financial records

Washington — A federal appeals court panel in New York ruled Wednesday that the Manhattan district attorney can enforce a subpoena to President Trump’s longtime accounting firm for troves of his business records and tax returns, the latest setback in the president’s efforts to block a New York grand jury from obtaining his financial information.

The unanimous ruling from a three-judge panel on the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals paves the way for a potential second Supreme Court showdown in the yearlong dispute over the subpoena to Mazars USA, Mr. Trump’s accounting firm. The 2nd Circuit upheld a lower court’s decision dismissing Mr. Trump’s effort to block Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance from obtaining the president’s financial records, but the court put enforcement of the subpoenas on hold to allow the president to appeal the ruling.

The Justice Department said it is reviewing the decision.

The dispute before the 2nd Circuit marks the second attempt by the president and his legal team to stop Manhattan investigators from gaining access to his business information. Vance is seeking Mr. Trump’s financial records, including his tax returns, dating back to 2011 as part of a criminal investigation into the president’s business dealings and hush-money payments made to two women who claimed they had affairs with Mr. Trump years before he was elected.

Mr. Trump suffered a string of losses in his first effort to block Vance from obtaining his records, with the Supreme Court in July rejecting claims he has “absolute immunity” from state criminal subpoenas, but sending the case back to the lower courts for further proceedings.

The president’s lawyers then challenged the subpoena again on different grounds, arguing it was overbroad and issued in bad faith.

In its opinion, the 2nd Circuit panel rejected Mr. Trump’s claims.

“It is neither

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