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Wichita settles split, approves car sale lot at Central/West

Wichita settles split, approves car sale lot at Central/West

The Wichita auto enthusiast won City Council approval Tuesday to open a small car-sales lot near Central and West, after a lengthy stop-and-start process that’s been going on since July.

The council action clears the way for up to four cars at a time to be sold on the parking lot at 4231 W. Central. Currently, that parking lot is shared by an automotive shop and a car upholstery business.

The car lot will be separately operated from the other businesses by applicant Jeremiah Leathers, who’ll be leasing four parking spaces along with a small office in the upholstery shop.

Leathers, a quality inspector in the aircraft industry, said cars are his passion and he’s been buying and selling them on the side for years.

He said he’s still working, but layoffs and furloughs in the aircraft industry, hard-hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, nudged him toward trying to turn his part-time hobby business into a full-time business.

He said hopes his tiny car lot will soon outgrow the location.

The council’s unanimous vote settles a split between the District 6 Advisory Board, which unanimously recommended denial and the Metropolitan Area Planning Commission, which unanimously recommended approval.

Getting a conditional-use permit to sell cars on Central “has not been the best experience,” he said.

The Planning Department originally recommended denying the permit because it would introduce a new use in that part of the “community core,” a roughly three-mile radius around downtown.

In July, the District Advisory Board agreed and unanimously urged the council to deny Leathers’ plan.

The next step was the Planning Commission. He won a recommendation of approval there, after agreeing to limit his stock to four cars at a time and other conditions dealing with lighting, signage, fencing and other issues.

Then, he had to go back

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Car insurance UK scam: Drivers warned there are ‘more opportunities’ for fraudsters

Car insurance UK scam: Drivers warned there are ‘more opportunities’ for fraudsters

Car insurance experts warn that a range of road users have suffered at the hands of fraudsters including the elderly and key workers. The comnets come after recent data shows fraudulent insurance claims rose by five percent in 2019.

However, experts have warned scams could shoot up to levels last seen in 2008 where the recession saw fraudulent claims rise by 17 percent.

The Insurance Fraud Bureau warns that at least one insurance scam takes place every minute in the UK.

Ben Fletcher, Director of the IFB warned the pandemic was seen as an opportunity by fraudsters to target a range of road users.

Mr Fletcher said: “With Covid-19 causing so many people to lose out financially it sadly means there are more opportunities for insurance scammers to exploit the vulnerable.

READ MORE: Drivers may be targeted by new car insurance scam today

However, as the UK plunges into a recession and many drivers struggling financially as a result of the pandemic, this could cloud many road users’ judgement when they receive an email offering money.

Ghost Broker scams have doubled in recent years and are more popular among young road users.

This is where fraudsters pose as a provider and offer cheap deals to vulnerable motorists on social media.

However, these policies are then found to be false which effectively leaves drivers without an agreement in place which would be breaking the law.

IFB chiefs also warn drivers to keep an eye out for crash for cash scammers who purposely hit your vehicle to make claims against your policy.

Experts warn that one in every ten injury claims is linked to crash for cash scams despite the safety risks.

Detective SuperIntendent Peter Ratcliffe, Head of the City of London Police’s Economic Crime Funded Units urged members of the public

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Car finance market up slightly in August despite drop in demand

Car finance market up slightly in August despite drop in demand

The consumer new car finance deals agreed in August were worth more than £1bn,

The UK consumer car finance market grew slightly in August despite a decline in the overall new car market, according to new figures. Data from the Finance and Leasing Association (FLA) showed a small increase in the number of cars acquired by private customers using finance deals.

Over the course of the month, private consumers agreed finance deals on almost 178,000 cars, up one percent on the same month in 2019. In total, FLA members dished out more than £2.7 billion in advances – an increase of eight percent on August last year.

The lion’s share of the growth was found in the used car market, where private customers acquired some 128,126 cars on finance last month. That’s a two-percent increase on the same period in 2019, but the value of those deals shot up by a massive 10 percent. As a result, the total value of advances came to £1.67 billion.

More on the car finance market:

The new car market saw more modest results, with the number of cars acquired on finance fell by one percent to just over 49,500. That is, perhaps, no surprise given figures from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) showed a drop in new car sales of almost six percent during August.

More surprising, though, is that the value of advances still rose by five percent to hit £1.04 billion, despite the doom and gloom surrounding the market. But figures also show finance deals have accounted for around 93.5 percent of new car sales in the past 12 months.

New cars in car dealership showroom

But with the impact of coronavirus, the lockdown and the current economic uncertainty shrouding the country and the car industry, the

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U.S. consumer inflation muted, just don’t buy a used car

U.S. consumer inflation muted, just don’t buy a used car

By Dan Burns

(Reuters) – U.S. consumers on balance paid only a little bit more for goods and services last month as supply chain disruptions that contributed to a bump up in inflation over the summer began to ease, a welcome respite for the millions who remain unemployed.

While that easing pressure on pinched consumers might offer a benefit to Republican President Donald Trump’s reelection prospects against Democratic challenger Joe Biden, it does come with a big “on the other hand” caveat: It is the latest sign of fading momentum in the rebound from this spring’s record-setting economic slump.

A bit of inflation typically is an indication of strengthening demand, an encouraging signal that consumers have reliable sources of income allowing them to contribute to growing an economy that hinges extensively on their spending. But with roughly 11 million still out of work and desperate for a new round of COVID-19 relief from Washington, September’s modest uptick in prices is no such signal.

Here’s Jefferies chief financial economist Aneta Markowska’s take: “After several months of above-trend gains, price pressures are finally normalizing. Both headline and core CPI increased by just 0.2% (month-to-month) in September, with the underlying details painting an even weaker picture.”

Graphic: September CPI: All about used vehicles https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/mkt/azgvojwqepd/Pasted%20image%201602602548532.png

In fact, she notes prices would have been unchanged but for one thing: The largest monthly increase in used car and truck prices since 1969. And with cash-strapped consumers increasingly reliant on their own transport to get to an on-site job, that’s no welcome development.

Food price increases, too, are moderating after a big run up in the spring, but where you eat makes a big difference.

If eating at home, as millions without work have no choice but to do, then food prices were lower for a third

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Fast Take: U.S. Consumer Inflation Muted, Just Don’t Buy a Used Car | Investing News

Fast Take: U.S. Consumer Inflation Muted, Just Don’t Buy a Used Car | Investing News

(Reuters) – U.S. consumers on balance paid only a little bit more for goods and services last month as supply chain disruptions that contributed to a bump up in inflation over the summer began to ease, a welcome respite for the millions who remain unemployed.

While that easing pressure on pinched consumers might offer a benefit to Republican President Donald Trump’s reelection prospects against Democratic challenger Joe Biden, it does come with a big “on the other hand” caveat: It is the latest sign of fading momentum in the rebound from this spring’s record-setting economic slump.

A bit of inflation typically is an indication of strengthening demand, an encouraging signal that consumers have reliable sources of income allowing them to contribute to growing an economy that hinges extensively on their spending. But with roughly 11 million still out of work and desperate for a new round of COVID-19 relief from Washington, September’s modest uptick in prices is no such signal.

Here’s Jefferies chief financial economist Aneta Markowska’s take: “After several months of above-trend gains, price pressures are finally normalizing. Both headline and core CPI increased by just 0.2% (month-to-month) in September, with the underlying details painting an even weaker picture.”

Graphic: September CPI: All about used vehicles https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/mkt/azgvojwqepd/Pasted%20image%201602602548532.png

In fact, she notes prices would have been unchanged but for one thing: The largest monthly increase in used car and truck prices since 1969. And with cash-strapped consumers increasingly reliant on their own transport to get to an on-site job, that’s no welcome development.

Food price increases, too, are moderating after a big run up in the spring, but where you eat makes a big difference.

If eating at home, as millions without work have no choice but to do, then food prices were lower for a third straight month.

If

Read the rest