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A global strategy chief shares 3 ways investors can navigate increased stock-market volatility in the coming months

A global strategy chief shares 3 ways investors can navigate increased stock-market volatility in the coming months

trader Gregory Rowe
NYSE trader Gregory Rowe works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange at the end of the trading day.


  • Willem Sels, HSBC Private Banking global chief market strategist, expects volatility to pick up in the next few months due to the US election and a renewed uptick of COVID-19 cases. 
  • In a Tuesday email he shared three strategies for how investors can manage the stock market volatility ahead. 
  • One of his strategies is to avoid the lure of low-quality stocks just because they’re cheap.  Instead, Sels said to seek out companies with strong balance sheets and long-term growth potential.

The upcoming US election and an uptick in cases of COVID-19 are leading to increased volatility and causing some investors to step back. Willem Sels, HSBC Private Banking global chief market strategist, expects volatility to pick up in the next few months, but said investors should remain in the market. In a Tuesday email he shared three strategies for investors to manage what’s ahead. 

1. Focus on quality assets

“What the September correction has shown is that, when valuations are high, it is unwise to go into lower quality assets just because they are cheaper,” Sels said. Investors should seek out companies with strong balance sheets as COVID-19 will continue to weigh on cash flows for longer than expected. For long-term growth, Sels is watching companies related to climate change, health technology, 5G, and the online economy.

2. Look for areas with promising growth

Sels also said he’s looking for areas with “promising growth” in the short and long term. “The US economic outlook currently looks better than in Europe, and data in China and Korea is more positive than in other EM countries,” he added.

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Macy’s, Inc. Announces Chief Financial Officer Transition

Macy’s, Inc. Announces Chief Financial Officer Transition

Adrian V. Mitchell to become Chief Financial Officer effective November 2, 2020

Felicia Williams, interim Chief Financial Officer, to join CEO Action for Racial Equity as a Macy’s, Inc. Fellow

Macy’s, Inc. (NYSE:M) today announced that Adrian V. Mitchell has been appointed chief financial officer, to take effect November 2, 2020.

Mitchell will be responsible for leading all finance functions including, accounting, treasury, investor relations, internal audit, financial/capital planning & analysis, and procurement. He will report to Jeff Gennette, chairman and chief executive officer of Macy’s, Inc.

“We’re delighted that Adrian is joining Macy’s, Inc. at this crucial time in our company’s journey and look forward to welcoming him on November 2,” said Gennette. “In a retail environment where change is accelerating beyond what we could have imagined a year ago, Adrian’s depth of financial and operational experience, coupled with his leadership in strategy, innovation, and transformation, will help us on our path to emerge a stronger company.”

Mitchell has extensive retail experience and a track record of success in financial, operational and strategy roles. Mitchell joins Macy’s, Inc. from Boston Consulting Group (BCG) where he is a Managing Director and Partner in the Digital BCG and Consumer Practices. Since joining BCG in 2017, Mitchell has led client work with a wide variety of retailers, helping them to solve their toughest challenges in an increasingly competitive and disruptive environment. Working primarily with Fortune 500 companies, his projects included organic and inorganic growth strategy, large-scale operational improvement projects and digital, data & advanced analytics efforts within retail operations across automotive, drugstore, fast food, mass and specialty retail companies.

Prior to joining BCG, Mitchell had wide-ranging retail experiences. This includes serving as Board Director and member of the Audit and Finance Committee at Recreational Equipment, Inc. from 2016 to 2017. He served

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A Wall Street chief strategist says US lawmakers need a deal on fiscal aid – even a small one will help save consumer spending

A Wall Street chief strategist says US lawmakers need a deal on fiscal aid – even a small one will help save consumer spending

FILE PHOTO: Traders gather at the booth that trades Abbott Laboratories on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, December 10, 2012.   REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Traders gather at the booth that trades Abbott Laboratories on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange


  • Crossmark Global Investment’s chief market strategist Victoria Fernandez told CNBC’s “Trading Nation” Tuesday US lawmakers need to decide on a fiscal package, even if it is smaller in size, to save consumer spending.
  • She said consumers have almost spent their consumer checks which is worrisome going into the holiday season. 
  • “Even if it is a smaller number, or a one-time check, it is going to give support to that consumer as we go into the last quarter of the year and that is where you need to start looking at your portfolio to balance that out a little bit,” she said. 
  • She said investors should look at a combination of growth and value stocks, as well as different segments of the financial services sector to weather uncertainty. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

US lawmakers need to decide on a fiscal stimulus package, even if it is a smaller one, to prop up consumer spending, particularly going into the holiday shopping period, Victoria Fernandez, chief market strategist at Crossmark Global Investments told CNBC’s”Trading Nation” Tuesday 

“We really need that consumer to hang in there. For that to happen, we will need to see another round of stimulus, even if it is a smaller deal, or not the $600 we saw before,” she said. “Even if it is a smaller number, or a one-time check, it is going to give support to that consumer as we go into the last quarter of the year and that is where you need to start looking at your portfolio, to balance that out a little bit.”

With around 10 million Americans still out of work, many consumers will have long since spent their

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Why the stock market’s sharp rally off March lows is even stronger than in seems, according to one Wall Street chief strategist

Why the stock market’s sharp rally off March lows is even stronger than in seems, according to one Wall Street chief strategist



a group of people standing in front of a computer: Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images


© Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images
Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

  • The market’s leadership is wider than perceived and consists of more than just the largest tech stocks, James Paulsen, chief investment strategist at The Leuthold Group, said Friday.
  • While cyclical sectors trail the S&P 500 by 5% on a market-weighted basis, they exceed the benchmark on an equal-weighted basis, Paulsen highlighted.
  • Similarly, the S&P 500’s outperformance over the small-cap-focused S&P 600 is halved when market weighting isn’t taken into account.
  • Strong gains from tech giants “distorted many traditional market signals” and possibly shifted investors’ views of the market, the strategist added.
  • Visit the Business Insider homepage for more stories.

Cyclical and small-cap stocks aren’t getting the credit they deserve for the market’s rapid recovery, James Paulsen, chief investment strategist at The Leuthold Group, said Friday.

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Tech giants played an undeniably large role in lifting indexes from their March lows. Crowding in mega-caps hit dot-com-era levels, and their outperformance led the Nasdaq to be the first major index to erase its pandemic-induced losses. Strategists warned of a bubble forming in the market and that leadership in the months-long rally was dangerously thin.

Yet certain gauges suggest the bull market’s drivers are more varied than just the popular tech giants. While cyclical sectors trail the S&P 500 by roughly 5% on a market-weighted basis, they’ve made a full recovery from the March trough and now outpace the benchmark on an equal-weighted basis, Paulsen said.

Read more: ‘The largest financial crisis in history’: A 47-year market vet says the COVID-19 crash was merely a ‘fake-out sell-off’ — and warns of an 80% stock plunge fraught with bank failures and bankruptcies



chart: Leuthold Group


© Leuthold Group
Leuthold Group

“Cyclicals have not done as well as the FAANGs — few stocks have — but relative to

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A Wall Street strategy chief says the market is flashing bullish signals as more stocks start to rally

A Wall Street strategy chief says the market is flashing bullish signals as more stocks start to rally



a man wearing a suit and tie: CNBC TV


© CNBC TV
CNBC TV

  • Miller Tabak’s chief market strategist told CNBC on Friday the stock market is signaling it has upside potential before Election Day. 
  • Matt Maley cited the outperformance of the Russell 2000 index and said small-cap stocks and chip stocks have room to grow. 
  • He’s less optimistic about the market in the long term, however. A second wave of the coronavirus and an expensive market could be bearish after the election, he said. 

Matt Maley of Miller Tabak  told CNBC on Friday that the stock market is signaling it has upside potential before Election Day.

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The chief market strategist said he is watching the recent outperformance of small-cap stocks. As of Thursday, the Russell 2000 small-cap index was up almost 6% week-to-date, compared to a roughly 3% gain in the S&P 500. The broadening out of the stock market rally, which was previously dominated by mega-cap tech names, is bullish, he said. 

Chip stocks have also been a leading indicator for the market recently, he said. If they rally further, it will be bullish for the market at least until Election Day, the added. 

Institutional investor strategy based on the time of year could also push the market higher, he said.

“We’re in the fourth quarter of the year — institutional investors, if the market keeps rallying, no matter what they think of the long-term value of the marketplace, they have to be in the market and that could push things higher,” Maley said. 

He added that small-cap stocks and chip stocks are enticing right now. Investors can begin to rotate some of their holdings in large technology stocks, which may be a slightly overbought, into chip stocks and cloud computing stocks. “We have a long way to go” in those smaller technology names, Maley

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