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Pigeon Family Market to close after 40 years in business

Pigeon Family Market to close after 40 years in business

PIGEON, Mich. (AP) — After operating for 40 years, the Pigeon Family Market announced it will be closing at the end of the month.

The market announced its closure in a Facebook post on Oct. 1, which extended thanks to all the customers, vendors, employees and other people that have become family to them over the years.

Shirley Ashmore, the general manager for the market, told the Huron Daily Tribune that ever since the Meijer in Bad Axe opened, their sales have gone down.

“We think that during the winter, it is going to get worse,” Ashmore said.

The closure leaves the village of Pigeon without a grocery store to call its own, with residents having to travel outside of town to do their shopping.


Dennis Hug, the store owner who lives in the Harbor Springs-Petoskey area of Northern Michigan, has owned the store for about four years after buying it from the Schuette family. He also owns the Caseville Family Market, with both known as IGAs before taking their current names.

Hug said a lot of money was invested into improving the store when he purchased it, but the residents of Pigeon did not respond the way he hoped after cleaning and fixing the place up.

“When you invest money, you expect a return,” Hunt said. “After operating the store for so many years, we were not able to take one penny of revenue out of it, we just kept putting money into it.”

Oddly enough, Hug said the coronavirus pandemic was good for the grocery business, since people were eating their food at home instead of going out to restaurants, but they did see an immediate decline once Meijer opened.

“Every store has a basic level of service needed for customers, and you need people working there for

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Pigeon Family Market to Close After 40 Years in Business | Michigan News

Pigeon Family Market to Close After 40 Years in Business | Michigan News

By ROBERT CREENAN, Huron Daily Tribune

PIGEON, Mich. (AP) — After operating for 40 years, the Pigeon Family Market announced it will be closing at the end of the month.

The market announced its closure in a Facebook post on Oct. 1, which extended thanks to all the customers, vendors, employees and other people that have become family to them over the years.

Shirley Ashmore, the general manager for the market, told the Huron Daily Tribune that ever since the Meijer in Bad Axe opened, their sales have gone down.

“We think that during the winter, it is going to get worse,” Ashmore said.

The closure leaves the village of Pigeon without a grocery store to call its own, with residents having to travel outside of town to do their shopping.

Dennis Hug, the store owner who lives in the Harbor Springs-Petoskey area of Northern Michigan, has owned the store for about four years after buying it from the Schuette family. He also owns the Caseville Family Market, with both known as IGAs before taking their current names.

Hug said a lot of money was invested into improving the store when he purchased it, but the residents of Pigeon did not respond the way he hoped after cleaning and fixing the place up.

“When you invest money, you expect a return,” Hunt said. “After operating the store for so many years, we were not able to take one penny of revenue out of it, we just kept putting money into it.”

Oddly enough, Hug said the coronavirus pandemic was good for the grocery business, since people were eating their food at home instead of going out to restaurants, but they did see an immediate decline once Meijer opened.

“Every store has a basic level of service needed for customers, and

Read the rest
Arsenal Owners Lend Big Financial Hand To Close Partey Deal

Arsenal Owners Lend Big Financial Hand To Close Partey Deal

KEY POINTS

  • Arteta needed infused funds to complete the Partey deal
  • Atletico unhappy with Thomas Partey deal
  • Arsenal management throwing full support to Arteta’s vision

Arsenal FC finally got Thomas Partey from Atletico Madrid although the process of doing so was not easy. As most know, the Gunners were strapped for cash and had to unload some of its players for it to push through. But it turns out that Mikel Arteta needed to make a special request from the owners to close the deal.

Among the players who had to be let go include Matteo Guendouzi, Mesut Ozil, Sead Kolasinac and Mohamed Elneny. Unfortunately, funds from potential transactions involving any of these players were deemed not enough. Hence, Arteta needed to ask owner Stan Kroenke for additional funds to close the Partey deal, The Athletic reported.

Arsenal owners approved the request of Arteta, refinancing the club’s current debt and also providing funds to complete the transfer. It was proof that management has faith in Arteta’s vision.

To recall, Arsenal pulled off the deal on the last day of the transfer deadline. The Gunners made the push, meeting Atletico’s $58 million fee to activate the release clause for the 27-year-old defender. But in a report from ESPN, it appears Los Indios was not happy with Partey with the way the last-minute deadline transaction went.

Atletico was informed of the deal roughly half-an-hour before the transfer deadline. It turns out that representatives from Arsenal were at their Madrid headquarters at the time to exercise the release clause. In all, Los Indios may have felt they were pressed to a corner and not given ample time to make a stand.

Also, the fact that Atletico had tried to make multiple offers to keep the Ghanaian player. But similar to past pitches, Partey

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Stocks look to extend gains after S&P 500’s highest close in a month

Stocks look to extend gains after S&P 500’s highest close in a month

Stock futures advanced Thursday morning, pointing to a higher open after the three major indices closed at their highest levels in more than one month a day earlier.

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Contracts on the Dow rose more than 120 points, or 0.4%, about two hours before the opening bell. S&P 500 and Nasdaq futures also gained. Shares of Regeneron (REGN) jumped more than 4% after the drugmaker said it had submitted a request to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for emergency use authorization of its Covid-19 antibody treatment, which had been taken by President Donald Trump after his Covid-19 diagnosis.

Traders clung to hope that some aid out of Washington – if not a multi-trillion dollar, comprehensive virus relief package – might transpire in the near-term.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Wednesday that she would be open to passing a bill to provide relief to airlines specifically, after Trump said late Tuesday that he would approve piecemeal measures including airline aid. Airline stocks, along with travel and leisure names, were flat to slightly higher in late trading, largely holding onto gains from the regular session Wednesday.

However, Pelosi also signaled that she would not be open to advancing a bill that would authorize another round of $1,200 direct checks to taxpayers, saying that that on its own would be insufficient to address the Covid-19 crisis. House Democrats last week voted to advance a larger package to inject another $2.2 trillion in aid to various parts of the economy.

“It’s been the question of the day, as to why we got the tweets we got over the last 24 hours, the market reaction we got into [Tuesday’s] close, and then the rally today,” Ed Mills, Raymond James Washington policy analyst, told Yahoo Finance Wednesday afternoon.

“Investors I’ve spoken to at Raymond

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Motley Fool to close Hong Kong business due to political uncertainty

Motley Fool to close Hong Kong business due to political uncertainty

HONG KONG, Oct 8 (Reuters)Investment news site Motley Fool will shutter its Hong Kong operations due to the uncertain political outlook in the Asian financial hub, according to a post on the company’s website earlier this week.

The move adds to ongoing concerns about the media and the investment environment in Hong Kong, following the implementation in late June of a new national security law, imposed by China, which introduced severe penalties for anything deemed as secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces.

The post, by Hayes Chan, Motley Fool’s Hong Kong lead analyst cited last year’s protests, the introduction of a National Security law and the United States and China’s economic decoupling as reasons for the uncertainty.

“With all those uncertainties, it’s hard to make predictable decisions to grow our Foolish business here over the next 3-5 years,” the statement said.

Hong Kong’s leader Carrie Lam has said journalists can report freely if they do not violate the security law.

The New York Times said in July it would move roughly a third of its staff to Seoul due to the political uncertainty and difficulties staff had in getting work permits.

Other Asian cities are hoping to lure financial business from Hong Kong, but financial institutions have, so far, not made any major public moves.

Tokyo is the only other Asian city where Motley Fool currently operates. The investment advisory service closed its Singapore business last year as regulatory requirements rendered it commercially unviable.

(Reporting by Alun John; Editing by Simon Cameron-Moore)

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The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

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