Browsed by
Tag: Dont

Winter Beaters Don’t Get Better Than the Tupolev A-3 Aerosledge, Russia’s Aircraft-Powered Snow Machine

Winter Beaters Don’t Get Better Than the Tupolev A-3 Aerosledge, Russia’s Aircraft-Powered Snow Machine

Early models had just 100 horsepower courtesy of a five-cylinder radial engine, however, most later models had 260-hp nine-cylinder radial engines sourced from light aircraft. To ensure the boat didn’t flip over or push itself off of the ground with this much power, the engine was pointed downwards at a few degrees so it was always pushing the craft into the earth. 

Control for the A-3 was handled by two rudders on the back of the craft that both directed the air from the propeller and extended to the ground to provide mechanical steering. These rudders were controlled by a steering wheel inside the cabin. In addition to turning left or right, the rudders could also both point outwards when the wheel was pulled towards the driver, allowing for aerodynamic braking. To ensure the aerosledge wouldn’t slip from left to right over ice, three stainless steel runners protruded from the hull to provide lateral grip.

Over snow, the A-3 could carry as much as 1,400 pounds, and allegedly travel as fast as 74 miles per hour. Over water, the payload was a lesser 660 lbs, and the craft was limited to a speed of 40 mph—but that’s still good by boat standards. At 13-feet long and 7-feet wide, there was room for a driver and four passengers. But even carrying all of those people, the craft allegedly has a draft of just two inches in the water. This is in part thanks to the hull providing a small amount of lift when traveling at higher speeds. That being said, this is not an Ekranoplan. It cannot remain aloft, even inside the ground effect.

Production of these machines lasted until the early 1980s, and they found various uses in the frozen parts of Russia, and other eastern European countries such as

Read the rest
U.S. consumer inflation muted, just don’t buy a used car

U.S. consumer inflation muted, just don’t buy a used car

By Dan Burns

(Reuters) – U.S. consumers on balance paid only a little bit more for goods and services last month as supply chain disruptions that contributed to a bump up in inflation over the summer began to ease, a welcome respite for the millions who remain unemployed.

While that easing pressure on pinched consumers might offer a benefit to Republican President Donald Trump’s reelection prospects against Democratic challenger Joe Biden, it does come with a big “on the other hand” caveat: It is the latest sign of fading momentum in the rebound from this spring’s record-setting economic slump.

A bit of inflation typically is an indication of strengthening demand, an encouraging signal that consumers have reliable sources of income allowing them to contribute to growing an economy that hinges extensively on their spending. But with roughly 11 million still out of work and desperate for a new round of COVID-19 relief from Washington, September’s modest uptick in prices is no such signal.

Here’s Jefferies chief financial economist Aneta Markowska’s take: “After several months of above-trend gains, price pressures are finally normalizing. Both headline and core CPI increased by just 0.2% (month-to-month) in September, with the underlying details painting an even weaker picture.”

Graphic: September CPI: All about used vehicles https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/mkt/azgvojwqepd/Pasted%20image%201602602548532.png

In fact, she notes prices would have been unchanged but for one thing: The largest monthly increase in used car and truck prices since 1969. And with cash-strapped consumers increasingly reliant on their own transport to get to an on-site job, that’s no welcome development.

Food price increases, too, are moderating after a big run up in the spring, but where you eat makes a big difference.

If eating at home, as millions without work have no choice but to do, then food prices were lower for a third

Read the rest
Fast Take: U.S. Consumer Inflation Muted, Just Don’t Buy a Used Car | Investing News

Fast Take: U.S. Consumer Inflation Muted, Just Don’t Buy a Used Car | Investing News

(Reuters) – U.S. consumers on balance paid only a little bit more for goods and services last month as supply chain disruptions that contributed to a bump up in inflation over the summer began to ease, a welcome respite for the millions who remain unemployed.

While that easing pressure on pinched consumers might offer a benefit to Republican President Donald Trump’s reelection prospects against Democratic challenger Joe Biden, it does come with a big “on the other hand” caveat: It is the latest sign of fading momentum in the rebound from this spring’s record-setting economic slump.

A bit of inflation typically is an indication of strengthening demand, an encouraging signal that consumers have reliable sources of income allowing them to contribute to growing an economy that hinges extensively on their spending. But with roughly 11 million still out of work and desperate for a new round of COVID-19 relief from Washington, September’s modest uptick in prices is no such signal.

Here’s Jefferies chief financial economist Aneta Markowska’s take: “After several months of above-trend gains, price pressures are finally normalizing. Both headline and core CPI increased by just 0.2% (month-to-month) in September, with the underlying details painting an even weaker picture.”

Graphic: September CPI: All about used vehicles https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/mkt/azgvojwqepd/Pasted%20image%201602602548532.png

In fact, she notes prices would have been unchanged but for one thing: The largest monthly increase in used car and truck prices since 1969. And with cash-strapped consumers increasingly reliant on their own transport to get to an on-site job, that’s no welcome development.

Food price increases, too, are moderating after a big run up in the spring, but where you eat makes a big difference.

If eating at home, as millions without work have no choice but to do, then food prices were lower for a third straight month.

If

Read the rest
Analysis: 2020 is not 2016, but don’t count Trump out yet | US & Canada

Analysis: 2020 is not 2016, but don’t count Trump out yet | US & Canada

Three weeks from election day, Donald Trump is trailing in the polls and some Democrats are plotting for the next four years under a Democratic president. That was the scene in 2016 and it’s shaping up to be the same in 2020, as Joe Biden’s solid, sustained lead in United States polls has increased in the last week.

Not so fast, President Trump’s campaign officials say. They are quick to remind how his candidacy was written off by virtually everyone, including many Republicans, four years ago this week, as he dealt with the fallout from the release of tape filmed behind the scenes of the US TV show Access Hollywood, in which Trump was recorded making vulgar remarks about women. Yet due to a unique political environment and a late-October surprise when the FBI reopened and then quickly closed its investigation into candidate Hillary Clinton’s emails, Trump was able to eke out victories in Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, delivering him an improbable victory.

The world has changed enormously in four years, as has the political situation in which Trump finds himself. Instead of railing against the establishment as an agent of change, Trump is now in charge and is being blamed for mishandling a once-in-a-century pandemic that has rocked the country and has directly affected him, hospitalising him and sidelining him from a week-and-a-half of crucial campaign travel.

That makes the ‘Look what Trump did in 2016’ a poor argument for why he may or may not still have a chance this year.

That being said, despite the massive momentum Biden seems to have and the political corner Trump has painted himself into, there are still small glimmers for Trump and his team, if he can successfully shake things up in these final three weeks.

Biden’s large, consistent lead

While

Read the rest
A fifth of Brits don’t know what a recession means

A fifth of Brits don’t know what a recession means

Millions of Brits may lack the financial knowledge to make the most of their money. Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire/PA
Millions of Brits may lack the financial knowledge to make the most of their money. Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire/PA

One in five Brits don’t understand what the word “recession” means, research suggests.

More than a fifth (22%) of UK adults told Raisin.co.uk Our research shows that more than a fifth (22%) of British adults are bewildered by financial terminology, putting them at a disadvantage in understanding and growing their money.

What’s more, two in five (42%) are concerned they’re not making the most of their money because they lack vital financial knowledge.

This rises to two in three (57%) of 23 to 34-year-olds – 56% of whom already have debt.

The term “effective annual rate” (EAR) – the return on a savings account, accounting for compounding interest – causes the most confusion, with 77% of people admitting they don’t know what it is.

READ MORE: UK economy faces ‘perfect storm’ as winter looms

However, words like “inflation” and “recession”, which appear frequently in the media – especially currently, during the COVID-19 pandemic – also confuse a fifth of people, with 19% and 20%, respectively admitting to not understanding what they mean.

This could potentially be leaving millions of Brits too ill-informed to sufficiently prepare for the financial impact of the coronavirus crisis, the study’s author noted.

Additionally, just 22% of adults feel they can turn to friends or family who work in the industry to help them understand the financial jargon, with only 15% speaking to their parents.

“The last 12 months have been incredibly testing for UK consumers,” said Kevin Mountford, co-founder of Raisin.co.uk.

“With multiple rate drops from the Bank of England, to wide-spread speculation of a recession and negative interest rates, there is a lot for consumers to process.

“The research clearly shows that people are too

Read the rest