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Soccer-Lower league clubs eye financial boost from ‘Big Picture’

Soccer-Lower league clubs eye financial boost from ‘Big Picture’

Oct 13 (Reuters)Several lower-league clubs have welcomed controversial proposals for restructuring England’s top flight, highlighting the financial boost the changes would bring as they struggle to stay afloat.

The proposals would give more power to the big Premier League clubs, reducing the top division to 18 teams from 20 for the 2022-23 season and scrapping the League Cup and Community Shield.

The Premier League would also provide 25% of future broadcast revenue to English Football League (EFL) clubs and a 250 million-pounds ($326 million) fund to help with the COVID-19 crisis.

EFL Chairman Rick Parry has said the plans, dubbed “Project Big Picture”, had been drawn up together with Liverpool and Manchester United, though the clubs have not made public statements on the proposals.

It is not clear how many Premier League or EFL clubs have been consulted about the proposals and the Premier League itself has been critical of the plans.

The government has criticised the plan as a “backroom deal” and a “power grab”.

But Nigel Travis, chairman of League Two (fourth-tier) Leyton Orient, told the BBC that several EFL clubs could disappear within five to six weeks without financial support.

“This isn’t about the pandemic, this is about a crisis in football that goes back many years,” Travis added. “Before the pandemic, 75% of clubs were losing money – that can’t continue.

“I know you are talking about ‘Project Big Picture’ – this is a great proposal as far as we are concerned. It is certainly very promising and clubs need it.”

Dale Vince, chairman of League Two’s Forest Green Rovers, said the plans would ensure financial stability in the EFL, while Fleetwood Town owner Andy Pilley said the move was a potential game-changer for lower league sides.

“We desperately need this money,” Pilley told

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Lower league clubs eye financial boost from ‘Big Picture’

Lower league clubs eye financial boost from ‘Big Picture’

(Reuters) – Several lower-league clubs have welcomed controversial proposals for restructuring England’s top flight, highlighting the financial boost the changes would bring as they struggle to stay afloat.



FILE PHOTO: Premier League - Chelsea v Liverpool


© Reuters/MICHAEL REGAN
FILE PHOTO: Premier League – Chelsea v Liverpool

The proposals would give more power to the big Premier League clubs, reducing the top division to 18 teams from 20 for the 2022-23 season and scrapping the League Cup and Community Shield.

The Premier League would also provide 25% of future broadcast revenue to English Football League (EFL) clubs and a 250 million-pounds fund to help with the COVID-19 crisis.

EFL Chairman Rick Parry has said the plans, dubbed “Project Big Picture”, had been drawn up together with Liverpool and Manchester United, though the clubs have not made public statements on the proposals.

It is not clear how many Premier League or EFL clubs have been consulted about the proposals and the Premier League itself has been critical of the plans.

The government has criticised the plan as a “backroom deal” and a “power grab”.

But Nigel Travis, chairman of League Two (fourth-tier) Leyton Orient, told the BBC that several EFL clubs could disappear within five to six weeks without financial support.

“This isn’t about the pandemic, this is about a crisis in football that goes back many years,” Travis added https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/54516180. “Before the pandemic, 75% of clubs were losing money – that can’t continue.

“I know you are talking about ‘Project Big Picture’ – this is a great proposal as far as we are concerned. It is certainly very promising and clubs need it.”

Dale Vince, chairman of League Two’s Forest Green Rovers, said the plans would ensure financial stability in the EFL, while Fleetwood Town owner Andy Pilley said the move was a potential game-changer for lower league

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Harris, Pence defend their tickets with an eye on their political futures

Harris, Pence defend their tickets with an eye on their political futures

Vice President Mike Pence, Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Kamala Harris and moderator Susan Page participate in the vice presidential debate in Salt Lake City. <span class="copyright">(Justin Sullivan / Pool Photo)</span>
Vice President Mike Pence, Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Kamala Harris and moderator Susan Page participate in the vice presidential debate in Salt Lake City. (Justin Sullivan / Pool Photo)

Kamala Harris stepped into the highest-profile moment of her political career Wednesday night, deploying what she has long touted as her superpower: her ability to “prosecute a case” against the Trump administration.

In her debate with Vice President Mike Pence, Harris used her skills as a former prosecutor to attack President Trump for his handling of the coronavirus crisis and the economy with a clarity that eluded her running mate, Joe Biden, in his chaotic debate with the president last week.

“The American people have witnessed what is the greatest failure of any presidential administration in the history of our country,” she said, decrying the administration’s “ineptitude.”

The debate — far tamer and more coherent than the Trump-Biden slugfest — may not make much difference in the outcome of this fall’s election, but it could count as Harris’ first audition for the next one.

As running mate to the 77-year-old former vice president, Harris is in the pole position for a future presidential bid, but she will not be uncontested in what will likely be a fierce internecine fight between progressives and more centrist Democrats.

Harris’ debate performance was “very helpful to the ticket going into November. It’s also helpful to her brand when you look to November and beyond,” said Cornell Belcher, a Democratic pollster.

Pence headed into the debate in a similar position: As vice president, he should be Trump’s political heir, but other ambitious Republicans, including some who share the president’s last name, are already eyeing the post-Trump White House.

The debate tested Pence’s unshakable loyalty to Trump, which is his strongest claim to the future support

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