Browsed by
Tag: growth

Pie Insurance Sees Record Growth and Surpasses $100M in Premium

Pie Insurance Sees Record Growth and Surpasses $100M in Premium

DENVER, Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Pie Insurance, an insurtech specializing in workers’ comp  insurance for small businesses, today announced it has exceeded $100 million in cumulative written premium and surpassed $100 million in annualized run rate premium. In less than 3.5 years since being founded, Pie Insurance has cemented its spot as the fastest insurtech company to hit these milestones. This monumental growth is evidence that small businesses, and the insurance agents who serve them, are ready to adopt a modern and automated insurance experience.

“Commercial insurance in the United States generates $300 billion in annual premiums. However, the industry operates in an almost entirely analog environment,” commented Dax Craig, Co-Founder and President of Pie Insurance. “Pie leverages technology to modernize the entire insurance experience for small businesses, and our rapid growth is a testament to the huge unmet need in the market.”

Today’s milestones follow Pie’s last funding in May, in which the company raised $127 million and formed its affiliated entity, Pie Carrier Holdings. To date, Pie has raised $188 million to further the company’s mission of transforming small business insurance by automating the entire quote to claim experience—starting with workers’ comp insurance. Pie’s use of advanced analytics enables quotes in 3 minutes and savings of up to 30% for small businesses.

“Reaching $100 million in written premium in such a short time since our founding shows that there is a massive appetite for workers’ comp insurance that is simple, trusted and affordable,” said John Swigart, Co-Founder and CEO of Pie Insurance. “We recognize the numerous challenges that small businesses are currently facing, and we believe finding insurance shouldn’t add to their burden. We’re proud to help small businesses around the country save money and get workers’ comp insurance  quickly so they can focus

Read the rest
Capitalism is in crisis. To save it, we need to rethink economic growth.

Capitalism is in crisis. To save it, we need to rethink economic growth.

That mindless growth, Hickel and his fellow degrowth believers contend, is very bad both for the planet and for our spiritual well-being. We need, Hickel writes, to develop “new theories of being” and rethink our place in the “living world.” (Hickel goes on about intelligent plants and their ability to communicate, which is both controversial botany and confusing economics.) It’s tempting to dismiss it all as being more about social engineering of our lifestyles than about actual economic reforms. 

Though Hickel, an anthropologist, offers a few suggestions (“cut advertising” and “end planned obsolescence”), there’s little about the practical steps that would make a no-growth economy work. Sorry, but talking about plant intelligence won’t solve our woes; it won’t feed hungry people or create well-paying jobs. 

Still, the degrowth movement does have a point: faced with climate change and the financial struggles of many workers, capitalism isn’t getting it done. 

Slow growth

Even some economists outside the degrowth camp, while not entirely rejecting the importance of growth, are questioning our blind devotion to it. 

One obvious factor shaking their faith is that growth has been lousy for decades. There have been exceptions to this economic sluggishness—the US during the late 1990s and early 2000s and developing countries like China as they raced to catch up. But some scholars, notably Robert Gordon, whose 2016 book The Rise and Fall of American Growth triggered much economic soul-searching, are realizing that slow growth might be the new normal, not some blip, for much of the world. 

Gordon held that growth “ended on October 16, 1973, or thereabouts,” write MIT economists Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee, who won the 2019 Nobel Prize, in Good Economics for Hard Times. Referencing Gordon, they single out the day when the OPEC oil embargo began; GDP growth in

Read the rest
The Finance 202: Joe Biden’s tax plan would barely dent growth, conservative group finds

The Finance 202: Joe Biden’s tax plan would barely dent growth, conservative group finds

The analysis concludes Biden’s plan would raise $2.8 trillion over the next decade from higher taxes on businesses, corporations and the wealthiest households. Over that time, AEI projects the higher taxes would reduce economic growth by a relatively modest 0.16 percent.

The plan would “make the tax code more progressive,” AEI’s Kyle Pomerlau and Grant Seiter write. And after slightly crimping growth in its first decade, it would “reduce debt-to-GDP in the second decade, leading to slightly higher GDP. However, in the long term, his plan would not raise enough to stabilize debt-to-GDP and would lead to a 0.18 percent smaller economy.”

The macroeconomic drag the AEI model anticipates roughly aligns with other analyses from the Tax Foundation and the Penn Wharton Budget Model, Pomerlau notes. In other words, rolling back most of the Trump tax cuts wouldn’t bring about the economic Armageddon the Trump campaign has depicted.

Neither would it jack up taxes on every American. 

Vice President Pence made that claim during his debate with Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.),  Biden’s running mate, last week. The AEI analysis finds the top 1 percent of taxpayers would see a 14.2 percent hit to their after-tax income next year. The rest of the top 5 percent would face a small uptick in their burden. But everyone else would receive an after-tax income bump. The largest such increase, of 11.3 percent, would go to the bottom 10 percent, thanks to a temporary expansion of the child tax credit, according to AEI.

The analysis finds that starting in 2030, the Biden plan would impose “modest” tax hikes on the bottom 95 percent of earners, which it attributes to higher taxes on businesses. That would appear to violate Biden’s pledge not to raise taxes on anyone earning less than $400,000

Read the rest
China’s Xi Jinping spotlights Shenzhen as future for economic growth, Hong Kong given back seat

China’s Xi Jinping spotlights Shenzhen as future for economic growth, Hong Kong given back seat

China’s President Xi Jinping praised the tech-hub city of Shenzhen in a landmark speech on Wednesday, leaving some puzzling over the future of nearby Hong Kong, as China’s traditional global foothold.

Xi said Shenzhen, often dubbed China’s Silicon Valley and home to tech giants Huawei and Tencent, was making “historic leaps” and “achieving miracles.”

He also announced that the area would be given more leeway to pursue opening-up reforms and become a “model city for a strong socialist country.”

Once a small fishing village adjacent to Hong Kong, Shenzhen is now home to about 13 million and was transformed in 1980 by veteran Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping, after he designated it a “Special Economic Zone,” carving out capitalist privileges in the staunchly communist country.

Retracing Deng’s footprints 40 years later during his own southern tour this week, Xi announced Shenzhen would again become a testing ground for foreign investment and talent, and a symbol of China’s place as a global economic power, he said.

His speech follows a five-year plan for the city published on Sunday, to ease regulations including land reforms, encouraging foreign workers and reducing red-tape in sectors such as bio-tech and telecoms. The city will also pilot China’s first digital currency.

Analysts see the focus on Shenzhen, which now has a GDP higher than Hong Kong’s, as a signpost to how China intends to manage its dizzying economic growth — with strict political dominance, while nearby economic powerhouse Hong Kong becomes less relevant.

“The strategy is to submerge the Westernized Hong Kong with more powerful Chinese rule,” said Kent Deng, professor of Chinese economic history at London’s LSE University.

“Xi will not give the West an inch. He sees Hong Kong as a threat to his rule over China. The Shenzhen model is political zero tolerance and

Read the rest
Germany’s 2020 growth forecasts are downgraded

Germany’s 2020 growth forecasts are downgraded

Advertising figures with a protective face masks in Munich, Germany.

Lennart Preiss | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Germany’s economic prospects for 2020 are looking increasingly bleak, with the country’s leading research institutes downgrading GDP (gross domestic product) forecasts for this year and beyond.

Publishing a joint economic forecast Wednesday, Germany’s prominent economists warned that the coronavirus pandemic is leaving what they called “substantial marks” on the German economy, adding that “its impact is more persistent than assumed in spring.”

They revised their economic outlook downward by roughly one percentage point for both 2020 and 2021. They now expect GDP to fall by 5.4% in 2020 (lower than a previous -4.2% forecast) and to grow by 4.7% (less than a previously forecast 5.8%) in 2021, and 2.7% in 2022.

The “Joint Economic Forecast” is published twice a year on behalf of the German Economy Ministry and is prepared by the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin) and the Ifo Institute in Munich, as well as several other organizations.

They said the downgrade follows a more pessimistic assessment of the recovery process. “Although a substantial part of the drop in output experienced in spring has already been recovered, the remaining catch-up process is the more difficult part of the return to normality,” Stefan Kooths, head of forecasting at the Kiel Institute, said on the outlook.

The downgrades are not surprising given a second wave of coronavirus cases that is ravaging Europe and no less Germany, a country that has been praised for its initial response to the virus in spring. Germany kept deaths from the virus low and still under 10,000, far lower than the toll seen in the U.K., France, Spain and Italy, which have all seen over 30,000 fatalities. Nonetheless, Germany, like its neighbors, has been seeing

Read the rest