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How to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month in East Tennessee

How to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month in East Tennessee

Virtual guests speakers are able to share their stories, dances and recipes during Hispanic Heritage Month celebrations.

TENNESSEE, USA — Local non-profits are working to make sure students are learning about Hispanic culture and traditions for Hispanic Heritage Month. 

Thrive Lonsdale works with the youth in the Lonsdale community to do just this. 

Communications Director of Thrive Lonsdale Jalynn Baker said the students they serve are very diverse from many backgrounds, including several Latin American countries. 

Normally, the non-profit partners with Lonsdale Elementary School to host a large Hispanic Heritage Month celebration. 

However, due to the pandemic, they were not able to do that this year. 

Instead, Thrive Lonsdale included more learning materials and resources for students to read. 

“We spent some extra time building a little curriculum that really celebrates their cultures and makes space for them to feel proud of where they come from,” Baker said. 

Additionally, Hola Lakeway serves Hamblen, Jefferson and Grainger Counties. 

For Hispanic Heritage Month, Hola Lakeway is using social media to connect with students in East Tennessee. 

The non-profit used Facebook Live to highlight Hispanic and Latino cultures around the globe. 

Virtual guest speakers are able to share their stories, dances and recipes from their culture.

“It’s good for the younger generations because they did not grow up this way,” said Executive Director Betsy Hurst of Hola Lakeway. “This way they can hear our stories… our traditions.” 

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3 Ways Your Small Business Can Pivot Toward Focusing More on Hispanic Consumers

3 Ways Your Small Business Can Pivot Toward Focusing More on Hispanic Consumers

It is estimated that by 2021 more than 50 percent of the U.S. population growth will be attributed to Hispanics based on a report from Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream. Today, youthful diversity is becoming the counterweight to white, aging consumers, and it is forcing brands to redefine themselves — to discover new market opportunities and develop more meaningful, culturally relevant customer experiences. 



a woman standing in front of a window


© Thomas Barwick | Getty Images


We live in a reactive society, not a proactive one, and Corporate America moves slowly. Sometimes, the procedures that companies have in place don’t allow them to react fast enough to market trends. It’s like the old motto that many executives cling to: “If it is not broken why fix it?”

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They think that if consumers want their products or services, they will buy them, and if not then so be it.

That outdated thinking won’t be sustainable moving forward, and it doesn’t have to be thanks to technology that has helped brands communicate to consumers. I remember in early 2000, many marketing executives didn’t believe in the power of digital and social media. Back then, I was participating in marketing meetings where executives had strong opinions about this new technology because it was challenging their status quo. I heard comments like, “This type of technology will never take off” and “I will never invest marketing dollars in it.” 

Now, many corporations are allocating between 40 to 60 percent of their marketing budget to digital and social media. 

That disruption a decade ago is similar to the one Hispanic consumers can create now. They are a big player and influencer in the marketplace. Yet, in the face of such a dynamic shift, I still encounter business owners who say the Hispanic market is not a top priority. They think they

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The $700 billion Hispanic business market in the U.S. is now at the tipping point

The $700 billion Hispanic business market in the U.S. is now at the tipping point

  • As gridlock over another round of stimulus for small business in Washington continues, 5 million Latinos are at risk of bankruptcy, a new study reveals on Sunday.
  • Pre-pandemic they were the fastest-growing cohort on Main Street and contributed 4% to U.S. GDP.
  • Latino companies that applied for the Paycheck Protection Program have seen a 21% drop in revenue since February while their costs for PPE and other safety measures rise.



a group of people walking on a city street: Small businesses line Bagley Avenue in the Mexicantown neighborhood of Southwest Detroit, Michigan.


© Provided by CNBC
Small businesses line Bagley Avenue in the Mexicantown neighborhood of Southwest Detroit, Michigan.

As gridlock over another round of stimulus for small business in Washington continues, 5 million Latinos are at risk of bankruptcy, a new study reveals on Monday. Pre-pandemic they were the fastest-growing cohort on Main Street and contributed 4% to U.S. GDP. Their demise portends a troubling trend that can upend communities across America.

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Statistics reveal the story. Latino companies that applied for the Paycheck Protection Program saw a 21% drop in revenue from February through September while their costs for PPE and other safety measures rose and continue to remain high. Additionally, they retrofitted their businesses to deal with the pandemic, which resulted in a huge amount of expenditure that exceeded their revenue in the summer. They spent a lot to stay open and ended with a negative 11% margin.They are now cash flow negative and are on the brink of going out of business, the annual Latino Small Business Biz2Credit survey reveals.

Times were particularly hard for companies in the Northeast and Midwest, but as the coronavirus spread across the country, other areas have suffered, as well. The Biz2Credit research found that non-Latino businesses also have struggled, although their revenue remains slightly above break even.

For the study, Biz2Credit analyzed the financial performance of 35,000 companies, including 3,000 Hispanic-owned

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