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Holding Verizon Will Not Help You Beat The Market

Holding Verizon Will Not Help You Beat The Market

Verizon stock (NYSE: VZ) increased almost 7.5% in the last 3 months and currently trades at $59 per share. The rise was driven by the company’s increased focus on investing in 5G expansion and tie-up with Disney which has reduced the subscriber churn rate. But will the company’s stock continue its upward trajectory over the coming weeks, or is a correction in the stock more likely?

According to the Trefis Machine Learning Engine, which identifies trends in a company’s stock price data for the last 20 years, returns for Verizon stock average only 0.2% in the next three-month (63 trading days) period after experiencing a 7.5% rise over the previous three-month (63 trading days) period. Notably, though, the stock is likely to underperform the S&P500 over the next three months (63 trading days), with an expected excess return of –1.3% compared to the S&P500.

But how would these numbers change if you are interested in holding Verizon stock for a shorter or a longer time period? You can test the answer and many other combinations on the Trefis Machine Learning to test Verizon stock chances of a rise after a fall and vice versa. You can test the chance of recovery over different time intervals of a quarter, month, or even just 1 day!

MACHINE LEARNING ENGINE – try it yourself:

IF Verizon stock moved by -5% over 5 trading days, THEN over the next 21 trading days, Verizon stock moves an average of 2.9 percent, which implies an excess return of 1.7 percent compared to the S&P500.

More importantly, there is 59%

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Can central banks keep holding off the Covid economic crisis? | Economics

Can central banks keep holding off the Covid economic crisis? | Economics

Having long been buttressed by ample liquidity, financial markets are entering the final quarter of 2020 amid an increasingly tentative global economic recovery, unusual political uncertainties and lagging fiscal and structural policy responses. And these headwinds come on top of the Covid-19 crisis, which has left most countries struggling to strike a balance between protecting public health, achieving a return to a semi-normal level of economic activity and limiting infringements on individual liberties.

In this context, the hope is that today’s generous liquidity conditions, enabled and supported by central banks, will continue to provide a bridge to a better 2021, not only reversing the economic and social damage but also delivering further gains to investors. But will this bridging operation, already deployed for several years to compensate for other headwinds, be sufficient to overcome what is an increasingly complex pandemic cocktail?

Recent economic data indicates that, outside of China and few other countries, the economic recovery remains uneven and uncertain, and is falling short of what is both needed and possible, in my opinion. Travel, hospitality and other service-sector activities continue to face considerable challenges, complicating the overall employment picture. Moreover, a growing number of companies in other sectors are pursuing “resizing” initiatives that will likely lead to less hiring or even a wave of layoffs.

Adding to these economic challenges are deepening political uncertainties, especially in the US. An already highly uncertain election process has been further complicated by Donald Trump’s Covid-19 infection. And now that a number of lawmakers have also contracted the virus, congressional deliberations on many vital matters have been delayed. The US Senate has been left with little time to consider anything other than the nomination of a new supreme court justice, which the Republican majority insists on pushing through before the end of

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