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Analysis: Why the Affordable Care Act Is Such a Hot Topic

Analysis: Why the Affordable Care Act Is Such a Hot Topic

The Affordable Care Act keeps coming up during the opening day of the Barrett hearings because the Supreme Court will hear a case Nov. 10 that potentially could put parts—or all—of the Obama-era health care law in jeopardy.

The Supreme Court previously preserved the ACA in decisions in 2012 and in 2015, so how is this an issue again? A group of Republican-led states found a new tactic for challenging the law after Congress in the 2017 tax overhaul law reduced to $0 the penalty for the ACA mandate that most people carry health insurance.

Chief Justice John Roberts in 2012 said the penalty for going without health insurance could be construed as a tax that Congress had the constitutional authority to levy. Now, without any financial penalty, the mandate can no longer be upheld as a constitutional exercise of Congress’s taxing power, the GOP states have argued.

A federal appeals court agreed with the argument last year and invalidated the insurance mandate, but it didn’t decide whether the rest of the sprawling health law could remain in place.

The Trump administration is no longer defending the law in court and is supporting the Republican challengers instead. A group of Democratic states has intervened to defend the health law in court.

If the Supreme Court were to throw out the entire law, it could create considerable upheaval in the health care system, though many court watchers believe that such a sweeping outcome isn’t likely. And a ruling that just strikes down the insurance mandate may not have much practical effect, given that there are no longer any financial penalties for forgoing coverage.

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It’s a Hot IPO Market. Now Roblox Is Going Public, Too.

It’s a Hot IPO Market. Now Roblox Is Going Public, Too.

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A scene from a Roblox game.


Courtesy Roblox

Roblox said Monday that it has filed confidentially with the Securities and Exchange Commission to go public.

The San Mateo, Calif., company has submitted a draft registration document to the SEC, a statement said. Roblox did not disclose how many shares it would offer or their price. It expects to commence the public offering following a review by the regulator.

The initial public offering comes roughly eight months since Roblox raised $150 million in funding in February. Andreessen Horowitz led that financing round, which reportedly valued Roblox at $4 billion. At the time, Roblox had 115 million monthly active users and more than 1.5 billion hours of monthly engagement. The company has raised $335.7 million in total funding, according to Crunchbase.

Founded in 2004, Roblox hosts child-friendly games focused on digital characters resembling Lego. Some of its most well-known games include “Booga Boogal,” “Ghost Simulator,” and “Theme Park Tycoon 2.” Roblox users can access games on a mobile device or a gaming PC. The company employs more than 800 people.

If launched this year, the Roblox offering would come during a surging time for the IPO market. Several companies, including Snowflake (ticker:

SNOW

) and Lemonade (

LMND

), have posted spectacular gains during their debuts.

Write to Luisa Beltran at [email protected]

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East Dallas is a ‘hot’ home market, firm says

East Dallas is a ‘hot’ home market, firm says

It is not surprising that East Dallas has become one of Dallas’ hottest markets, according to Allie Beth Allman and Associates, with residents of all ages attracted to its green spaces, active lifestyle and location close to downtown and White Rock Lake.

Here are two East Dallas homes on the market.

The renovated three-bedroom Austin stone design at 5923 Winton St. is close to Mockingbird Elementary School. Offered by Nancy Lukken, this residence features a double-car rear-entry garage and an extra parking spot. The interior provides $40,000 in updates and air conditioning that was installed in 2016. Two bathrooms were remodeled with period tile and Kohler fixtures. The kitchen has stainless-steel appliances, double ovens, a custom-built pantry and pull-out storage. Relax on the patio or front porch and let the sprinkler system maintain the landscaped yard.

Susie Thompson is marketing the four-bedroom home situated on a corner lot at 2235 Forest Hollow Park. Located within a gated community, this residence features an open floor plan with wood flooring, 28-foot ceilings and a downstairs primary suite. The kitchen was remodeled in 2017 with updates that include white cabinetry, granite countertops, double ovens, a gas cooktop, farmhouse sink and wine refrigerator. The primary bathroom offers a jetted tub, dual vanities and two walk-in closets. The backyard has a covered porch and a pond and firepit with stone seating.

To find your East Dallas home, visit alliebeth.com.

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Businesses shut in effort to contain virus in New York City hot spots

Businesses shut in effort to contain virus in New York City hot spots

NEW YORK (AP) — Hundreds of businesses and schools in New York City neighborhoods where coronavirus cases have spiked were closed Thursday by order of the governor, but questions swirled about how effectively officials could enforce the shutdown in areas where it has been met with resentment.

The new rules were also met with legal resistance, as the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and Agudath Israel of America, an Orthodox Jewish umbrella organization, filed lawsuits over a provision limiting attendance at indoor religious services to no more than 10 people.

Confusion and dismay reigned as the restrictions began to take effect.

In Brooklyn’s Borough Park section, the scene of two nights of protests against the clampdown by Orthodox Jews, some merchants subject to the shutdown order appeared to be operating as usual at midday, including a barber shop, cellphone stores and a toy store.

Mayor Bill de Blasio said 1,200 city workers would be out on the streets doing enforcement, though some of those efforts involved trying to educate businesses about rules imposed with little warning in hastily drawn zones with confusing borders.

All nonessential businesses in areas designated “red zones” in parts of Queens and Brooklyn by Gov. Andrew Cuomo were supposed to shut. Public and private schools were supposed to close, as well, within both the red zones and surrounding “orange zones” designated by the Democratic governor.

Exactly where those zones began and ended, though, wasn’t easily apparent from maps released by the governor’s office or the city. Parents at one Brooklyn school protested that their school had been shut by the city even though it lay outside the area the governor had designated for school closures.

The new restrictions involve parts of Brooklyn and Queens in New York City, sections of Orange and Rockland counties in the

Read the rest
Businesses shut in effort to contain virus in NYC hot spots

Businesses shut in effort to contain virus in NYC hot spots

NEW YORK — Hundreds of businesses and schools in New York City neighborhoods where coronavirus cases have spiked were closed Thursday by order of the governor, but questions swirled about how effectively officials could enforce the shutdown in areas where it has been met with resentment.

The new rules were also met with legal resistance, as the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and Agudath Israel of America, an Orthodox Jewish umbrella organization, filed lawsuits over a provision limiting attendance at indoor religious services to no more than 10 people.

Confusion and dismay reigned as the restrictions began to take effect.

In Brooklyn’s Borough Park section, the scene of two nights of protests against the clampdown by Orthodox Jews, some merchants subject to the shutdown order appeared to be operating as usual at midday, including a barber shop, cellphone stores and a toy store.

Mayor Bill de Blasio said 1,200 city workers would be out on the streets doing enforcement, though some of those efforts involved trying to educate businesses about rules imposed with little warning in hastily drawn zones with confusing borders.

All nonessential businesses in areas designated “red zones” in parts of Queens and Brooklyn by Gov. Andrew Cuomo were supposed to shut. Public and private schools were supposed to close, as well, within both the red zones and surrounding “orange zones” designated by the Democratic governor.

Exactly where those zones began and ended, though, wasn’t easily apparent from maps released by the governor’s office or the city. Parents at one Brooklyn school protested that their school had been shut by the city even though it lay outside the area the governor had designated for school closures.

The new restrictions involve parts of Brooklyn and Queens in New York City, sections of Orange and Rockland counties in the Hudson

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