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ANALYSIS-Israel’s second lockdown carries a hefty economic price

ANALYSIS-Israel’s second lockdown carries a hefty economic price

By Maayan Lubell, Tova Cohen and Steven Scheer

JERUSALEM/TEL AVIV, Oct 8 (Reuters)Restaurateur Tamir Barelko has had enough.

Israel’s decision last month to impose a second nationwide lockdown after a resurgence in coronavirus infections has dealt a hammer blow to the economy and the livelihoods of small business owners, Barelko says.

He launched a petition calling for small businesses to defy the lockdown and reopen from Sunday, the end of the Jewish holiday season, and has attracted more than 60,000 supporters for his campaign on Facebook FB.O over the past two weeks.

The finance ministry and central bank support reopening offices of companies that can avoid face-to-face contact with customers, or employ less than 10 workers – highlighting growing tensions over Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s handling of the pandemic, which is set to see Israel’s economy shrink this year for the first time in nearly two decades.

“The economy is breaking down, people’s hope is breaking down,” said Barelko, speaking in the Tel Aviv restaurant he runs, now empty of customers. “If the government does not give us the opportunity to live and to provide for our families, we’ll do it ourselves.”

Thousands of people have taken to the streets across Israel for almost daily protests that have built up since July, demanding Netanyahu resign over his handling of the crisis and over corruption charges he faces in court, which he denies.

The country, with a population of nine million, has reported nearly 280,000 COVID-19 cases and more than 1,800 deaths.

Schools and most offices, shops and restaurants are closed, unless they provide “vital services” such as supermarkets, pharmacies and banks, and people must stay within a kilometre from their home – harsher restrictions than in many other countries fighting a second wave.

Netanyahu had wide public

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Israel’s second lockdown carries a hefty economic price

Israel’s second lockdown carries a hefty economic price

JERUSALEM/TEL AVIV (Reuters) – Restaurateur Tamir Barelko has had enough.

A youth wearing a protective face mask sits on a pavement near shuttered shops amid Israel’s second national coronavirus disease (COVID-19) lockdown in Ashkelon, Israel October 7, 2020. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Amir Cohen

Israel’s decision last month to impose a second nationwide lockdown after a resurgence in coronavirus infections has dealt a hammer blow to the economy and the livelihoods of small business owners, Barelko says.

He launched a petition calling for small businesses to defy the lockdown and reopen from Sunday, the end of the Jewish holiday season, and has attracted more than 60,000 supporters for his campaign on Facebook FB.O over the past two weeks.

The finance ministry and central bank support reopening offices of companies that can avoid face-to-face contact with customers, or employ less than 10 workers – highlighting growing tensions over Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s handling of the pandemic, which is set to see Israel’s economy shrink this year for the first time in nearly two decades.

“The economy is breaking down, people’s hope is breaking down,” said Barelko, speaking in the Tel Aviv restaurant he runs, now empty of customers. “If the government does not give us the opportunity to live and to provide for our families, we’ll do it ourselves.”

Thousands of people have taken to the streets across Israel for almost daily protests that have built up since July, demanding Netanyahu resign over his handling of the crisis and over corruption charges he faces in court, which he denies.

The country, with a population of nine million, has reported nearly 280,000 COVID-19 cases and more than 1,800 deaths.

Schools and most offices, shops and restaurants are closed, unless they provide “vital services” such as supermarkets, pharmacies and banks, and people

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North of England leaders vow to oppose lockdown without financial support

North of England leaders vow to oppose lockdown without financial support

Ministers are facing open revolt from leaders in northern England over fresh coronavirus restrictions due to be announced within days, as mayors, MPs and council leaders vowed they would fiercely oppose any new measures without substantial financial support.

Pubs, bars and restaurants across Merseyside, Greater Manchester and parts of the north-east of England could be forced to close next week in an effort to slow the soaring infection rate.

MPs in the north of England and Midlands are receiving a briefing from the government’s Covid taskforce in which officials and ministers are expected to outline the alarming rise in cases and hospital admissions.

Andy Burnham, the Greater Manchester mayor, said he was “losing patience” with the government after the planned shutdown leaked on Thursday – days after Matt Hancock promised to improve its communication with local leaders in a call with regional mayors on Monday.

Alongside the leaders of Liverpool, Newcastle and Leeds, Burnham is demanding that local authorities be allowed to see details of the restrictions – and any proposed financial support – before they are announced. “There is no way at all I will sign off on the closure of any business without a local furlough scheme,” he said.

The Guardian understands that the majority of northern England, from Barrow in Cumbria, to Merseyside, Greater Manchester, Lancashire, parts of Yorkshire and most of the north-east, as well as Nottinghamshire in the Midlands will be under some form of coronavirus restrictions under a new three-tier traffic light system due to be outlined within days.

The sharp rise in hospital admissions in the worst-hit areas has alarmed decision-makers in the regions as well as Whitehall. More than a third of Covid patients in England’s hospitals are in the north-west of England, where hospital admissions have risen sevenfold since the start

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Study: Closing UK schools leads to more deaths in lockdown

Study: Closing UK schools leads to more deaths in lockdown

  • A new paper has said that closing UK schools during lockdown led to more COVID-19 deaths than if they had stayed open.
  • The paper, by Professor Graeme Ackland, was published in the British Medical Journal on Wednesday and is a re-analysis of a model published by Imperial College London in March.
  • The Imperial model prompted the UK to enforce a lockdown, in line with many other countries facing outbreaks.
  • But, Ackland argues, some of its provisions were counter-productive. He claims that closings schools and universities in particular likely led to “more deaths compared with the equivalent scenario without the closures.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A new scientific paper claims that the UK’s decision to close schools and universities in March as part of its lockdown strategy resulted in more COVID-19 deaths than if they stayed open.

The peer-reviewed paper, was written by Graeme Ackland, professor of computer simulation at The University of Edinburgh, was published in the British Medical Journal on Wednesday.

It is a re-analysis of a model published by Imperial College London on March 16.

The Imperial model was hugely significant. It prompted the UK government to abandon its strategy of herd immunity, and impose a series of lockdown measures, including the closure of schools. The paper warned the UK was set for 510,000 deaths in the absence of such action.

In the course of 10 simulations, Ackland said the addition of school closures to other lockdown variables increased the number of deaths.

His argument is that mitigation strategies should focus on keeping the virus from older, more vulnerable people, and not on preventing the spread in settings where most people are young.

FILE PHOTO: Parents walk their children to school on the last day before their official closure, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in West London, Britain, March 20, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Parents walk their children to school in West London on March 20, 2020.

Reuters


“Adding school and university closures to case isolation,

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Sipprell Gets Creative With Homemade Lockdown Visuals For “Bad History”

Sipprell Gets Creative With Homemade Lockdown Visuals For “Bad History”

Last month, South London singer-songwriter Sipprell released her latest EP, Bad History, a six-track collection of gems flecked with dashes of jazz, R&B, Latin influences and electronica, but all focused around her softly-delivered vocals. Today she returns with visuals for the title track which, for obvious reasons, were homemade.

Directed by Aiden Harmitt-Williams, the video was filmed this summer in her flat and clearly the restrictions of lockdown have brought out her inventive side. Starting out as a seemingly lowkey affair, much of the first half centres around shots of Sipprell, relaxing in fairly casual attire, but then we switch to the garden and all of a sudden we’re in another century and she’s dressed in a huge flowing dress with an even larger hat.

“We filmed the video with a very small team at my flat on one of the hottest days of the year,” she told Complex over email. “The idea was to show different versions of myself from different times. We got creative with props and styling and made the most out of the space. It’s very much a homemade lockdown visual. We had fun and I’m proud of how it came out!”

“Bad History” is taken from the EP of the same name, which is out now.

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