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How his presidency would affect your small business

How his presidency would affect your small business

Rhonda Abrams, Special to USA TODAY
Published 10:00 a.m. ET Oct. 14, 2020

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Learning to be flexible and to pivot quickly has helped O’Brien achieve great success as a reporter and entrepreneur.

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In the three decades I’ve been advocating for small businesses, there’s never been a more challenging time for them and for the self-employed. And we’re far from out of the woods as this pandemic is not yet under control, and the economy is likely to take a long time to recover.

We’ve seen how President Donald Trump and his administration have responded to this crisis, but what would an administration headed by Joe Biden and Kamala Harris look like for small business and the self-employed?

“Day one, the focus is getting the coronavirus under control,” said Rhett Buttle, Biden for President National Business Advisor. “One in six small businesses are probably not coming back, and COVID is top of mind for most small businesses. The effort to contain the virus and ensure recovery is part of Biden’s small business plan, and small business stakeholders and the focus on small business will be a critical part of that.”

Looking at Biden’s top 6 proposals:

► Grants, not loans, for true small businesses that have lost substantial revenue. “We’ve been doing small business roundtables around the country,” said Buttle, “and we’ve heard directly from small business owners that not only was PPP (the Paycheck Protection Program) mismanaged but they weren’t sure how forgiveness worked.”

My take: Biden has this right. Grants, instead of loans, were the better choice originally for small businesses who were being told they’d need to take on debt when they had no idea when they’d even be able to open – and low confidence in a program with a bungled rollout. Grants

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South Carolina announces new relief for nonprofits, small businesses

South Carolina announces new relief for nonprofits, small businesses

Small and minority-owned businesses and nonprofits in South Carolina may apply for grant awards to be reimbursed for qualifying expenditures for providing services or revenue loss because of the response to COVID-19.



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Announced by the Department of Administration on Monday, grants in the amount of $2,500 up to $50,000 will be funded with federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act money.

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Businesses and nonprofits can apply for relief grants beginning Oct. 19, and applications must be received no later than Nov. 1.

To qualify for a grant, small and minority-owned businesses must employ 25 or fewer employees, be located in South Carolina, have been operational from Oct. 13, 2019, to present and must have experienced economic effects because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Nonprofits must be a registered 501(c)(3) organization, registered as a public charity in South Carolina, physically located within the state and have been operational from Oct. 13, 2019, to present.

Grants will be administered by the Department of Administration in cooperation with Guidehouse Inc., a professional grant management services provider.

Tags: States, News, Coronavirus, Business, South Carolina

Original Author: Vivian Jones, The Center Square

Original Location: South Carolina announces new relief for nonprofits, small businesses

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A Wall Street chief strategist says US lawmakers need a deal on fiscal aid – even a small one will help save consumer spending

A Wall Street chief strategist says US lawmakers need a deal on fiscal aid – even a small one will help save consumer spending

FILE PHOTO: Traders gather at the booth that trades Abbott Laboratories on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, December 10, 2012.   REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Traders gather at the booth that trades Abbott Laboratories on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange


  • Crossmark Global Investment’s chief market strategist Victoria Fernandez told CNBC’s “Trading Nation” Tuesday US lawmakers need to decide on a fiscal package, even if it is smaller in size, to save consumer spending.
  • She said consumers have almost spent their consumer checks which is worrisome going into the holiday season. 
  • “Even if it is a smaller number, or a one-time check, it is going to give support to that consumer as we go into the last quarter of the year and that is where you need to start looking at your portfolio to balance that out a little bit,” she said. 
  • She said investors should look at a combination of growth and value stocks, as well as different segments of the financial services sector to weather uncertainty. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

US lawmakers need to decide on a fiscal stimulus package, even if it is a smaller one, to prop up consumer spending, particularly going into the holiday shopping period, Victoria Fernandez, chief market strategist at Crossmark Global Investments told CNBC’s”Trading Nation” Tuesday 

“We really need that consumer to hang in there. For that to happen, we will need to see another round of stimulus, even if it is a smaller deal, or not the $600 we saw before,” she said. “Even if it is a smaller number, or a one-time check, it is going to give support to that consumer as we go into the last quarter of the year and that is where you need to start looking at your portfolio, to balance that out a little bit.”

With around 10 million Americans still out of work, many consumers will have long since spent their

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Ways small shops shifting holiday sales amid COVID-19

Ways small shops shifting holiday sales amid COVID-19

Watty Brooks Hall, the owner of the Brooks Collection, plans to keep her iPhone charged and ready for more FaceTime calls this holiday season.

Her Collierville, Tennessee gift shop introduced virtual shopping for consumers who don’t feel comfortable coming inside but want to see the pottery, gifts and home goods up close. Hall also plans to post more photos on Instagram and Facebook where engagement has been up since the pandemic.

Texas-based Stag Provisions also is engaging more with shoppers on social media. It will also stock more comfortable clothes such as t-shirts and sweatpants this holiday season as people continue to spend a lot of time at home. 

And Gibson’s Bookstore, New Hampshire’s oldest independent book shop established in 1898, hopes to drive online sales with its new curbside pickup option.

Small retailers across the country have had to get creative to keep the lights on after dealing with temporary closures and restrictions amid the coronavirus pandemic. Now they’re preparing for a holiday shopping season unlike any they have ever experienced.

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National retailers are amping up the pressure with earlier promotions to spread through the season, but small stores may benefit because of their size and ability to personalize the shopping experience.

“We deliver. We ship. We do curbside,” Hall said, adding her shop near Memphis doesn’t sell merchandise on its website. “It’s just trying to keep a small business alive is what it boils down to.”

COVID-19 relief needed: Your favorite restaurant or small business – as many as 36,000 – face closure without coronavirus relief

Small business advice: Not all business changes need to be big, sometimes a good pivot is small, thoughtful and consistent

The Brooks Collection introduced virtual shopping

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3 Ways Your Small Business Can Pivot Toward Focusing More on Hispanic Consumers

3 Ways Your Small Business Can Pivot Toward Focusing More on Hispanic Consumers

It is estimated that by 2021 more than 50 percent of the U.S. population growth will be attributed to Hispanics based on a report from Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream. Today, youthful diversity is becoming the counterweight to white, aging consumers, and it is forcing brands to redefine themselves — to discover new market opportunities and develop more meaningful, culturally relevant customer experiences. 



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We live in a reactive society, not a proactive one, and Corporate America moves slowly. Sometimes, the procedures that companies have in place don’t allow them to react fast enough to market trends. It’s like the old motto that many executives cling to: “If it is not broken why fix it?”

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They think that if consumers want their products or services, they will buy them, and if not then so be it.

That outdated thinking won’t be sustainable moving forward, and it doesn’t have to be thanks to technology that has helped brands communicate to consumers. I remember in early 2000, many marketing executives didn’t believe in the power of digital and social media. Back then, I was participating in marketing meetings where executives had strong opinions about this new technology because it was challenging their status quo. I heard comments like, “This type of technology will never take off” and “I will never invest marketing dollars in it.” 

Now, many corporations are allocating between 40 to 60 percent of their marketing budget to digital and social media. 

That disruption a decade ago is similar to the one Hispanic consumers can create now. They are a big player and influencer in the marketplace. Yet, in the face of such a dynamic shift, I still encounter business owners who say the Hispanic market is not a top priority. They think they

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