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Iowa State football vs. Texas Tech: Pregame analysis, prediction

Iowa State football vs. Texas Tech: Pregame analysis, prediction

Ben Visser, correspondent

AMES — A closer look at Saturday’s Big 12 football game between No. 24 Iowa State (2-1, 2-0) and Texas Tech (1-2, 0-2) at Jack Trice Stadium in Ames. Kickoff is 2:30 p.m. (ABC).

Iowa State offense


In Iowa State’s two conference games, the rushing attack has gotten stronger as the game has gone on.


Against TCU, Breece Hall and Kene Nwangwu combined for 129 rushing yards in the second half and, against Oklahoma, Hall rushed for 100 yards in the second half.


“I think the last two games you’ve got to give a little bit of credit to the coaching staff making the right adjustments to put the guys in the right situations to be successful,” ISU Coach Matt Campbell said. “Then I think you’ve got to give a lot of credit to our kids. I think they’ve done a great job preparing to play four quarters. I think their mentality and their ability to play four quarters has certainly given (us) an opportunity to find success within the scheme.


“I think that’s more of a collective whole and we’ll see if that continues as the season progresses.”

Iowa State defense


The Cyclones’ front seven continues to play impressive football. Oklahoma averaged just 3.5 yards per rush. TCU was at 2.3 and Louisiana averaged 3.4.


The front seven demolished TCU’s offensive line to the tune of six sacks and it followed that up with another impressive performance against Oklahoma. Iowa State recorded two sacks against the Sooners while going against one of the best offensive lines in the Big 12 and facing a mobile quarterback in Spencer Rattler.


The area of concern for the ISU defense is in the secondary.

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In three games, the

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A Tech Mind With A Creative Spirit Competes For Top Prize At BE Smart Hackathon

A Tech Mind With A Creative Spirit Competes For Top Prize At BE Smart Hackathon

Jayla Williams’ passion is problem-solving, which is fortunate as the year 2020 delivered a surplus of practical problems that need solutions. The Fisk University sophomore is competing for the first time in Black Enterprise’s annual BE Smart Hackathon, hosted by American Airlines.

As part of a five-member team of Fisk tech wizards, Williams is contributing to a data-crunching project that will help airlines accommodate travelers with respiratory issues. As she explains it: “We can provide safe departure times and make sure passengers with health issues aren’t surrounded by people when they arrive at the airport.”

The effort is a creative technical adaptation to life under a pandemic designed to protect both lives and jobs – a perfect distillation of the BE Smart ethos, and a telling example of Williams’ creative spirit.

Speaking from her home in Hillsboro, Oregon, near Portland., where she distance learning her way to a degree in computer science, Jayla talked about her journey and where it might take her.

“I was born in Los Angeles, but we moved to Oregon when I was one. I have always been creative. I enjoyed art, painting, singing, playing instruments. I studied flute for seven years. I especially enjoyed writing songs. I guess I’ve always been attracted to the idea of creating something from nothing – making something just from the tools I have around me.”

At first glance, one might not see how a love for the creative arts connects a budding career in technology, but for Williams, it was a natural transition. She excelled at math and science, earning a 4.0 average in high school. College was a given, but where?

“I applied to 31 colleges and most accepted me, including Fisk. To be honest, I really wasn’t looking hard at Fisk; it was not my number one

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Regulators Eyeing Tech To Boost Financial Stability

Regulators Eyeing Tech To Boost Financial Stability

Regulators around the globe are eyeing tech to boost financial stability

Enhanced supervisory technology (SupTech) with strong governance and skilled human oversight could well have important benefits for financial regulators around the in efforts to increase economic stability in their nations and around the globe, said a report prepared for the G20.

“SupTech could improve oversight, surveillance and analytical capabilities, and generate real time indicators of risk to support forward looking, judgement based, supervision and policymaking,” regulators told the Financial Stability Board.

Importantly as well, real-time and non-traditional data may allow authorities to be more pro-active in their supervision, FSB said.

As an example of the efficiencies SupTech can provide financial regulation, the authors of the report pointed out the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has found

algorithms are five times better than random testing at identifying language in investment adviser regulatory filings that could merit further investigation for potential wrongdoing’

The possible improvement in quality arising from automation of previously manual processes has significant appeal to the overseers, the FSB reported in a study released today.

The use of SupTech innovations and strategies in regulatory reporting for microprudential regulation has grown significantly in the last four years, the authors found.

Artificial intelligence was the most commonly deployed application of SupTech.

National financial regulators surveyed by the FSB lauded SupTech’s potential for gains in the effectiveness and efficiency of oversight and improvements in risk management and compliance.

But the risk of handing too many of their functions to technology vendors and the potential for poor data quality were on the minds of the regulatory leaders responding to a poll and other resources consulted by the FSB’s Financial Innovation Network.

“(They were particularly concerned) over-reliance on methods built on historic data could lead to incorrect inferences about the future,” the study

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Musk says Tesla to use new batteries, tech at Berlin factory; flags production risk

Musk says Tesla to use new batteries, tech at Berlin factory; flags production risk

(Reuters) – Tesla Inc Chief Executive Elon Musk said on Wednesday the company will produce Model Y with a new structural battery design and technology at its Berlin factory next year and that could result in a “significant production risk”.

The U.S. electric carmaker plans to manufacture a new version of its Model Y crossover vehicle, and possibly even battery cells at the site. Last month, Musk said that Tesla will use its Germany-based plant to demonstrate a radical overhaul of how its cars are built.

The company plans to start the production of Model Y at Gigafactory Berlin during the second half of 2021.

Tesla’s new battery cell – a larger cylindrical format called 4680 that can store more energy and is easier to make – is key to achieving the goal of cutting battery costs in half and ramping up battery production nearly 100-fold by 2030.

The company’s new structural battery pack requires the new 4680 battery cells in order to work.

Musk said on Wednesday that it will take about two years for Tesla factories in Fremont and Shanghai to embrace the new technology.

“Fremont and Shanghai will transition in 2 years when new tech is proven,” Musk said in a tweet https://bit.ly/2I8Gam3.

The company said last week that it delivered 139,300 vehicles in the third quarter, a quarterly record for the electric carmaker.

Tesla’s delivery push has been supported by its new Shanghai factory, the only plant currently producing vehicles outside California, as it is also building a new vehicle and battery manufacturing facility near Berlin.

(Reporting by Sabahatjahan Contractor and Kanishka Singh in Bengaluru, Editing by Sherry Jacob-Phillips)

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Tanzania: Digital Tech Stimulating Financial Inclusion

Tanzania: Digital Tech Stimulating Financial Inclusion

THE widespread usage of digital technology in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is an essential phenomenon that fosters productivity in the digital economy and integrates markets in the region.

In the last quarter of 2018, SSA was home to 456 million unique mobile subscribers – representing an increase of 20 million subscribers over the previous year.

Projections from the GSMA Intelligence report for 2019 suggest that by 2025, there will be more than 600 million mobile subscribers in the region, thus about 50 PER CENT of the total population in SSA will be connected.

With a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 4.6 per cent and an additional 167 million mobile subscribers from now to 2025, SSA continues to be the fastest growing region in the world. The hotspots for the fastest growth levels from the period to 2025 will be in Nigeria and Ethiopia – accounting for growth rates of 19 per cent and 11 per cent, respectively.

The total number of smartphone connections in SSA had also increased to 302 million in 2018 with smartphone connections in the area expected to reach 700 million by 2025 – this will represent smartphone adoption rate of 66 per cent.

The effective usage of digital technology improves productivity and stimulates economic growth in SSA – in 2018, the use of mobile technologies and services generated an economic value of $144 billion, accounting for 8.6 per cent of SSA’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

The mobile ecosystem played a pivotal role by supporting close to 3.5 million jobs directly and indirectly – in all, $15.6 billion was raised via taxes which proved to be a major financial resource for funding the public sector. According to GSMA Intelligence, by 2023, mobile technologies and services will account for 9.1 per cent of GDP, thus about $185 billion.

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